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Full text of "Catalogue .."

c 

££6nH 
1859/4* -1862./S3 



The person charging this material is re- 
sponsible for its return to the library from 
which it was withdrawn on or before the 
Latest Date stamped below. 

Theft, mutilation, and underlining of books 
are reasons for disciplinary action and may 
result in dismissal from the University. 

UNIVERSITY OF ILLINOIS LIBRARY AT URBANA-CHAMPAIGN 



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IIAR3O 

JAN.3 Q 






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Mcrrmal Emir mib 



1859-60 




BLOOMINGTON, ILL.: 

PRINTED BY X. G. XASOX, PE 
I860. 




M 

CATALOGUE 

OF THE 

Mt Utarmal Hmtoitg, 



FOR THE 



ACADEMIC YEAR ENDING JUNE 29, 1860. 




BLOOMUSTGTON, ILL. : 

-PRINTED BY N. C. NASON, PEORIA, ILL. 
I860. 



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^a 





BOARD OF EDUCATION 



STATE OF ILLINOIS. 



Hon. S. W. MOULTON, Shelbyville, President. 

Hon. NEWTON BATEMAN, ex off. a member and Secretary. 

PEEKINS BASS, Esq., Chicago. 
GEO. BTJNSEN, Esq., Belleville. 
Hon. 0. B. DENIO, Scales Mound. 
JOHN J. GILLESPIE, Esq., S'te. Marie. 
C. E. HOYEY, Esq., Bloomington. 
Hon. JOEL S. POST, Decatur. 
Hon. WM. H. POWELL, Springfield. 
GEO. P. EEX, M.D., Perry. 
A. E. SHANNON, Esq., Carmi. 
Hon. WESLEY SLOAN, Golconda. 
WM. H. WELLS, Esq., Chicago. 
Prof. DANIEL WILK1NS, Bloomington. 
SIMEON WEIGHT, Esq., Kinmundy. 



Hon. J. E. McCLUN, Bloomington, Treasurer. 










FACULTY. 



CHAS. E. HOVEY, 

Instructor in the History, Science and Methods of Education. 

IEA MOOEE, 

Instructor in Mathematics. 

EDWIN C. HEWETT, 

Instructor in Geography and History. 

LEANDEE H. POTTEE, 

Instructor in Language. 

CHAUNCEY M. CADY, 

Instructor in Tocal Music. 

LEWIS P. CLOVEE, 

Instructor in Drawing. 

Miss MAEY M. BEOOKS, 

Instructor in the Model School. 



Miss FRANCES A. PETERSON, EDWIN PHILBROOK, 

JOHN HULL, J. HOWARD BURNHAH", 

JOSEPH G. HOWELL, E. AARON GOVE, 

Assistant Pupil Teachers. 



Note. — Mr. J. A. Sewell lias been appointed to the chair of Natural Sci- 
ences for the coming year ; Miss Frances A. Peterson, Assistant in the 
Normal Department ; Mr. Oliver Libby and Miss Fannie M. Washburn, In- 
st ructors in the Model School. 






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&£$ 



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STUDENTS. 



SENIOR CLASS. 



Sarah M. Dunn, 
Elizabeth J. Mitchell, 
Frances A. Peterson, 
Mary F. Washburn, . 

Enoch A. Grastman, Jr., 
Peter Harper, 
Silas Hayes, Jr., 
Joseph Gr. Howell, 
John Hull, 
Edwin Philbrook, 

Seniors, 



Bloomington, McLean. 
Blooming ton, McLean. 
Sublette, Lee. 
Bloomington, McLean. 

Hudson, McLean. 
Peoria, Peoria. 
Bloomington, McLean. 
Duncanton, White. 
Salem, Marion. 
Vandalia, Fayette. 



10. 







STATE NORMAL UNIVERSITY 



^MIDDLE CLASS. 

SECTION A. 
Sophie J. Crist, .... Bloomington, McLean. 



Amanda C. Noyes, 
Emma M. Trimble, 

Lorenzo D. Bovee, 
J. Howard Burnham, 
John T. Curtiss, 
James H. Dutton, 
E. Aaron Gove, 
Henry B. Norton, 
Peleg R. Walker, 



Sarah E. Beers, . 
Sarah E. Fell, 
Marion Goodrich, 
Helen F. M. Grennell, 
Phebe W. Jones, 
Sarah E. Town, 

James R. Fyffe, 
Ebenezer D. Harris, 
Duncan G. Ingraham, 
Jehu Little, 
Moses I. Morgan, 
Henry C. Prevost, 



SECTION B. 



Griggsville, Pike. 
Washington, Tazewell. 

Elwood, Will. 
Barrington, Cook. 
Otter Greek, Jersey. 
Metamora, Woodford. 
New Rutland, Lasalle. 
Scott, Ogle. 
Lindenwood, Ogle. 



W. Urbana, Champaign. 
Bloomington, McLean. 
Clinton, DeKalb. 
Hudson, McLean. 
Aurora, Kane. 
Fitz Henry, Ogle. 

Magnolia, Putnam. ' 
Lenox, Warren. 
Carlinville, Macoupin. 
Marshall, Clark. 
Naperville, JDuPage. 
Bloomington, McLean. 



* The Middle Class is composed of such students as, June 29th, 1860, 
had been members of the Institution more than one year, and less than 
three years. 







STATE NORMAL UNIVERSITY. 



James F. Ridlon, 
Logan H. Roots, 
Justin S. Spaulding, 
Edwin Waite, 
Charles W. Wills, 



Monmouth, Warren. 
Tamaroa, Perry. 
Metamora, Woodford. 
Sycamore, DeKalb. 
Canton, Fulton. 



SECTION C. 



Ellen J. Boughton, 
Emeline E. Crocker, 
Martha W. Fay, 
*Ann Goodsell, . 
Martha M. Marble, 
Anna B. Roberts, 

D. W. Beadle, 
George B. Robinson, 

Middle Class, 



Bloomington, McLean. 
Marion, Ogle. 
Bloomington, McLean. 
Clear Creek, Alexander. 
Bloomington, McLean. 
Morton, Tazewell. 



Galena, Jo Daviess. 
McLeansboro, Hamilton. 



35. 



* Deceased. 






10 




STATE NORMAL UNIVERSITY. 



JUNIOR CLASS 



Lucy J. Abraham, 
Clara Baker, 
Lizzie Carleton, 
Margaret Chalmers, 
Marianne Clarke, 
Ella C. Fisk, 
Sarah F. Gove, 
Julia A. Ives, 
Mary E. Jones, 
Emily Junk, 
Ellen Luther, 
Helen L. McCray, 
Esther M. Sprague, 
Elizabeth Wakefield, 



T. L. Bacon, Jr., 
William C. Baker, 
Usher F. Clemens, 
William H. h! Fuller, 
Francis M. Gastman, 
John M. House, 
H. W. Johnson, 
Fred. B. Jones, 
Samuel L. Marshall, 
Davis W. Miller, 



SECTION A. 



Trivoli, Peoria. 
Farmington, Fulton. 
Griggsville, Pike. 
Peoria, Peoria. 
Collinsville, Madison. 
Bloomington, McLean. 
New Rutland, Lasalle. 
Oquawha, Henderson. 
Hudson, 31c Lean. 
Normal, McLean. 
Peoria, Peoria. 
Woodstock, McHenry. 
Crete, Will. 
Hey worth, McLean. 



Rosemond, Christian. 
Scott, Ogle. 

Metropolis City, Massac. 
Oquawha, Henderson. 
Hudson, McLean. 
Richview, Washington. 
Marion, Williamson. 
Lacon, Marshall. 
McLeansboro, Hamilton. 
Jonesboro, Union. 



* The Junior Class is composed of such students as have become mem- 
bers of the Institution during the current academic year. 




I 





STATE NORMAL UNIVERSITY. 



11 




Gould Hyde Norton, 
John X. Wilson, 



Kate L. Bacon, 
Mary Baker, 
Margaret A. Brown, 
Caroline A. Clark, 
Ellen M. Cone, 
Jennie M. Cone, 
Amelia A. Denton, 
Frances E. English, 
Sarah M. Leal, 
Anna E. Maxwell, 
Lucie Seaton, 
Jennie Sloo, 
Harriet E. Stewart, 
Amanda A. Vancil, 
Bebecca Wilkinson, 

Ephraim D. Carrothers, 
William G-essner, 
Albert J. Ives, 
James E. Johnson, 
Henderson W. Kester, 
Milus M. Livesay, 
Walter F. Locker, 
William W. Murphy, 
Daniel B. Puffer, 
J. K. Walker, 



SECTION B. 



Scott, Ogle. 
Blooming ton, McLean. 



Rosemond, Christian. 
Scott, Ogle. 

Mt. Pleasant, Be Witt. 
Mendota, Lasalle. 
Farmington, Fulton. 
Farmington, Fulton. 
Joliet, Will. 
Dale, McLean. 
Friendship, McDonough. 
Bloomington, McLean. 
Galesburg, Knox. 
Cairo, Alexander. 
Hennepin, Putnam. 
VanciVs Point, Macoupin. 
Trivoli, Peoria. 

Tamaroa, Perry. 
Mt. Pulaski, Logan. 
Oquawka, Henderson. 

Oxbow, Putnam. 
Richview, Washington. 

Taylorsville, Christian. 
Mt. Pleasant, Be Witt. 
Mt. Palatine, Putnam. 
Havana, Mason. 



SECTION C. 
Elizabeth D. Armstrong, . . Middletown, Champaign. 









12 STATE NORMAL 


UNIVERSITY. 


Emily Cooke, 


Kickapoo, Peoria. 


Lemora J. Ellerton, 


Marion , De Witt. 


Mary A. Fuller, 


Tremont, Tazewell. 


Sytheria E. Harkness, 


Elmwood, Peoria. 


Anne B. Hockaday, 


. Newport, Lake. 


Sarah E. Hunter, 


Vermont, Fulton. 


Edith F. Johnson, 


Mendota, Lasalle. 


Lydia L. Morgan, 


Oswego, Kendall. 


Phebe A. Rice, 


. Mendota, Lasalle. 


Amanda Roberts, 


Morton, Tazewell. 


Mary Tomlin, 


Charleston, Coles. 


Mary E. Wilderman, . 


Belleville, St. Clair. 


William S. Allen, . 


. Havana, Mason. 


Charles M. Clark, 


Aledo, Mercer. 


Valentine Denning, 


. Hudson, McLean. 


"William H. Durham, . 


Genoa, DeKalb. 


William D. Hall, . 


Vermillion, Lasalle. 


Abraham B. Keagle, . 


Butler, Montgomery. 


L. Beecher Kellogg, 


. McHenry, McHenry. 


Andrew T. Mitchell, . 


Dale, McLean. 


Marvin J. Nye, . . 


. - Waukegan, Lake. 


G-eorge Peter, 


Millstadt, St. Clair. 


Thomas M. Roberts, 


. Morton, Tazewell. 


John H. Thompson, 


Normal, McLean. 


John W. Watts, . 


. Hope, Lasalle. 


Junior Class, 


77. 








STATE NORMAL UNIVERSITY. 



13 




MODEL -SCHOOL PUPILS. 



George Adolph, 
Katie Anderson, 
Estella Baker, 
Lucy Ballard, 
Henry Ballard, 
Minnie Benedict, 
Darius Benjamin, 
George Bradner, 
Samuel Buttles, 
Lizzie Buttles, 
Augusta Carlile, 
Josephine Conner, 
Anna Cessford, 
Emma Cessford, 

Model School, 



Mary Davis, 
William Eddy, 
James Gillett, 
Fanny Graves, 
Walter Graves, 
Clara Haines, 
George Hanna, 
Thomas Hawks, 
Ella Kellogg, 
Dilla Kellogg, 
Nancy Kinzell, 
Frank Lewis, 
Walter Marble, 
Mary Mathews, 

41. 



Oliver Montross, 
Ellen O'Brien, 
Luther Pardee, 
Edward Phillips, 
Ellen Eood, 
Fanny Kowley, 
Katie Smith, 
Hamilton Spencer, 
Lewis Stookey, 
Hurd Thompson, 
Fanny Vreeland, 
Morris Wilkins, 
John Willard. 






^ 




SUMMARY 



Senior Class, 
Middle Class, 
Junior Class, 



Ladies. Gentlemen. Whole No. 

4 6 10 
15 20 35 

42 35 77 



Total, 



61 61 122 



Primary, "Model-School" Class, 



41 




£ 





STATE NORMAL UNIVERSITY. 



15 






Course of Study. 

Tabular Vie-w. 


1st Year. 


2d Year. 


3d Year. 




1 


2 


3 


4 


5 


6 


1 


8 | 9 i 


Terms. 


w 

CD 

id 


d 

CO 


d 


d 


d 

CO 


d 


6 


d 

CO 


d 


o> 


I 
II 


Metaphysics 








+ 












15 


Hist, and Methods of Educ. 
Const'ns. of U. S. and Illin's. 
School Laws of Illinois. . . . 

English Language 

Arithmetic 

Algebra 










+ 


+ 


+ 




+ 


52 
















+ 




13 


















+ 


12 


+ 


+ 


+ 


+ 


+ 


+ 




+ 




93 


+ 


+ 




1 










28 
12 


III 






+ 


1 










Geometry 


1 




+ 




+ 








27 


Natural Philosophy 

Book-Keeping 














+ 






15 
12 


















+ 


Geography 


+ 


+ 


+ 














40 

28 


1 
IV 


History 

Astronomy 








+ 


+ 
























+ 




13 


Chemistry 











+ 




— 







13 
12 
15 
12 


V 


Botany 


— 




+ 











+ 




+ 


Zoology 








Vocal Music 


+ 


+ 


+ 


+ 


+ 


+ 


+ 


+ 


+ 


28" 


VI 


Writing and Drawing 




+ 


+ 


+ 


+ 


+ 


+ 


+ 


+ 


+ 


28 


VII 


+ 


+ 


+ 




+ 


+ 


+ l 




80 
15 
25 


o 
5" 


Algebra 








+ 












Higher Mathematics 
















+ 


+ 









COURSE OF STUDY 



The Divisions I, II, III, etc., in the foregoing Table, are made 
with reference rather to the studies in charge of different teachers 
than to a strictly logical grouping of subjects. The annexed syl- 
labus is intended as a Key to the Table. 



DIVISION I. -Mr. Hovey. 

Metaphysics. Fourth Term. Mental Philosophy precedes and is made 
the basis of instruction in the Theory and Art of Teaching. It comprises — 
(1.) An explication of terms. (2.) A general inquiry into the nature of mind. 
What is it ? What are its Facts, Laws, and Results? The facts and laws of 
Knowledge, Feeling, and Exertion. (3.) A more particular study of Con- 
sciousness, Perception, Memory, Imagination, and the Reflective and Regu- 
lative Powers. (4.) The Feelings. Theory of Pleasure and Pain. 

Theory and Art of Teaching. The Fifth, Sixth and Seventh Terms are 
occupied, in this Department, with the study of the Science, Methods and 
History of Education. The course of necessity takes a somewhat wide range, 
so that only a part of the topics can here be enumerated. (1.) The Order, in 
time, of the Development of the Mental Faculties, and the exercises best ad- 
apted to encourage their growth. The special purpose of each faculty, and 
the means to train it. Relation of the Mind to the Body, and the effect of 
the vigorous exercise of each upon the other. Laws of Bodily Health. Ven- 
tilation; Posture; Gymnastics; Formation of Courses of Study. (2.) Motives. 
The'incentives which a teacher may allow to act upon himself or his pupils. 
The Conscience — how it should be educated. (3.) The Organization and 
Classification of Schools. Programme of Daily Exercises. The Recitation. 
School Government. (4.) History of Systems and Methods of Education. 
Biographies of Eminent Teachers. (5.) Drill Exercises in Teaching. Obser- 
vation and Practice in the Model School. General Teaching Exercises before 
the Normal School. 

Eighth Term. The Constitutions of the United States and of the State of 
Illinois. Duties of Teachers as Citizens. 






STATE NORMAL UNIVERSITY. 17 




Ninth Term. The School Laws of Illinois. School Supervision and Man- 
agement. School-House Architecture. Practice in the Model School. Gen- 
eral Exercises in the Normal School. 



DIVISION II. -Mr. Potter. 

Reading. First Term. Analysis of Words according to their elementary 
sounds. Articulation and Pronunciation. Compass and Flexibility of Voice. 
Analysis of Words according to their derivation and formation. 

Grammar. Second Term. Etymology during the first half of the term. 
Aim to teach the office of each part of speech in the construction of senten- 
ces. Critical Parsing. During the last half of the term, Construct, Analyze, 
and Parse, sentences of various kinds. Daily exercise throughout the term 
in the Correction of False Syntax. 

Third Term,. Analysis and Construction of Sentences continued. Rules 
of Syntax. Capitalization. Consideration of Abridged Propositions and Idi- 
omatic Forms and Constructions. Daily exercise in the Correction of False 
Syntax. 

Rhetoric. Fourth Term. Formation of the English Language. Literary 
Taste. Figurative Language. Style and its varieties. Punctuation. Com- 
position, Analysis and Amplification of subjects. 

Reading. Fifth Term. Modulation. Prosody. Composition read once 
a week during the term. 

Literary Criticism. Sixth Term. Examine the style of the best English 
Authors of different periods. Study particularly the style of Milton, Addison, 
Goldsmith, etc. Blair's Rhetoric. Compositions during the term. 

Eighth Term. History of English Literature. Rise and Development, in 
England and America, of Poetry, History, Romance, the Essay, Oratory, and 
Metaphysics. Principal Authors in each department. Newspapers, Reviews, 
and Magazines. English Literature compared with that of other nations. 
Orations and Essays written weekly, and delivered or read in the presence of 
all the students. 




DIVISION III. -Mr. Moore. 

Arithmetic. First Term. The Decimal System ; including Decimal Frac- 
tions, so called. Factoring, and its application to Common Multiples and 
Divisors. Fractions. Compound Numbers. 



M 



Se 



^a 





STATE NORMAL UNIVERSITY. 



Second Term. Ratio and Proportion. Percentage, with its application to 
Loss and Gain, Commission, Insurance, etc. Percentage with time, including 
Interest, Discount, Partnership, and Equation of Payments. Exchange (In- 
land and Foreign). Extraction of 2d and 3d Roots of numbers. Arabic 
method of Notation, using bases other than 10 ; applied particularly to Duo- 
decimals. 

Algebra. Third Term. Algebraic Notation. Factoring, with application 
to Divisors and Multiples. Fractions. Equations of First Degree. Extrac- 
tion of the Roots of Algebraic quantities. Rules deduced for the extraction 
of the Roots of Numbers. Radicals. 

Fourth Term {Optional). Equations of 2d Degree. Ratio and Propor- 
tion. Series: including the Progressions, Binomial Expansion, Permutation, 
Undetermined Coefficients, Methods of Interpolation, and the Methods of sum- 
ming Special Forms ; Piling of Balls and Shells. Logarithms, with Methods of 
Computing the Tables. Exponential Equations, with Position. Interest and 
Annuities. 

Geometry. Fifth Term. Straight Line, and Surfaces bounded by Straight 
Lines. The Circle. Extra Theorems and Problems given for demonstration 
and solution. 

Sixth Term. Solids bounded by Planes. The Cylinder. The Cone. Sur- 
face and Solidity of Sphere. Plane Trigonometry, with its application to 
Land Surveying. Leveling. Variation of Magnetic Needle. 

Eighth and Ninth Terms (Optional). Equations of Point, Right Lines, and 
Circle. Equations of Point, Right Lines, and Plane in Sphere. Equations 
of Cylinder and Cone. General Equation of Conic Section referred to its 
own Plane. General Equation of 2d Degree between two Variables. Loci. 
Surfaces of Revolution. Differential Calculus. Integral Calculus. 

Physics. Seventh Term. Laws of Motion and Mechanics. Hydrostatics 
and Hydraulics. Pneumatics. Optics. Electricity and Magnetism. 



DIVISION IV. -Mr. Hewett. 

Geography. First Term. (1.) General Principles of Geography: Execu- 
tion of Maps, and Outline of South America, 15 lessons; Andes Mountains 
and countries containing them, 13 lessons; remaining countries of South 
America, 5 lessons ; Cities of South America, 5 lessons ; Review, 5 lessons. 
Total for South America, 43 lessons. (2.) Outline and Map of North Ameri- 
ca, 5 lessons ; Russian and British America, 5 lessons ; New England and New 
York, 12 lessons. Astronomical Geography, Latitude and Longitude, Day 
and Night, the Seasons, etc., 5 lessons. Review, 5 lessons. 

^ M 





Second .Term. (1.) Kemaining States and Territories of the United States, 
22 lessons; Mexico, Central America, etc., 5 lessons; Review, 3 lessons. 
Total for North America, 52 lessons. (2.) Outline and Map of Europe, 5 
lessons; Mountains and Rivers of the Continent, 5 lessons; Rapid glance at 
the countries of the Continent, 10 lessons ; More thorough glance at Britain 
as a Model, 10 lessons ; Review, 5 lessons. Total for Europe, 35 lessons. 

Third Term. (1.) Outline and Map of Asia, 5 lessons; Mountains and 
Rivers of Asia, 5 lessons ; Countries and Cities, 10 lessons ; Total for Asia, 
20 lessons. (2.) Physical Geography. Review of the Earth's Forms, with 
a glance* at the theory of its Origin, 10 lessons; Physical Life of the 
Earth, Temperature, Atmospheric and Marine Currents ; Rains, and the 
Effects of Climatic Conditions on Vegetable and Animal Life, 12 lessons ; 
Historical View of the Earth : the Relations of its Forms and Physical Life 
to the Development of the Human Race, 8 lessons ; Review, 10 lessons. 
Total for Physical Geography, 40 lessons. 

United States History. Fourth Term. Voyages, Discoveries, and In- 
dian Tribes, 10 lessons; Colonial History, 15 lessons; French War and Revo- 
lution, 20 lessons ; Subsequent History, with a special study of Illinois, 15 
lessons; Review, 15 lessons. Text-Book — Willson. 

Ancient History. Fifth Term. One Term (13 weeks); 65 Lessons. 
Early Asiatic Nations, 8 lessons; Grecian History, 12 lessons; Roman His- 
tory, 15 lessons; Most Prominent Events of the Middle Ages, 10 lessons ; Brit- 
ons, 5 lessons; Review, 15 lessons. Text-Book — Weber. 

[Note. — The course in Astronomy is not yet fully determined.] 



DIVISION V.- Mr. Sewell. 

Chemistry. Fifth Term. Names and Properties of Elements; Symbols; 
Formula? ; Chemical Affinity, etc. Laws of Definite Proportions. Behav- 
ior of Chemical Bodies toward each other. Changes of Form, Color, Prop- 
erties. Air, Water, Light, — their relations to organic life. Organic Chemis- 
try. Food of Plants. Outline of Chemical Analysis, qualitative and quanti- 
tative. Philosophy of Chemistry. 

Botany. Sixth Term. Structure of Plants, Mode of Growth, etc. Their 
relations to each other. Classification. Systems of Analysis, natural and 
Linnaean. Written Analysis of at least seventy-five species of native plants 
by the Natural system. 

[Note. — The course in Physiology and Zoology is not yet fully deter- 
mined.] 





DIVISION VI.- Mr. Cacly. 

Vocal Music — Two Lessons a Week. First Term. Diatonic Scale. Mu- 
sical Notation. Simple exercises in Sight-Singing. Exercises in Vocal Cul- 
ture calculated to secure the proper action in the air-supplying organs (as the 
lungs, chest, and abdominal muscles) in expelling the air from the lungs, and 
in respiration. 

Second Term. Dynamic Expression. Minor Scale. Transposition of the 
Scale. Exercises in Sight-Singing. Chanting. Exercises in Vocal Culture 
calculated to secure the proper action of the tone-producing organs (as the 
larynx, vocal cords, and glottis) in the forcible commencement of the tone, 
or the shock of the glottis, and the union of the different registers. 

Third Term. Study of plain metrical tunes, easy glees, rounds, and 
catches. Exercises in Vocal Culture calculated to secure the proper action 
of the tone-modifying organs (as the nasal and other cavities of the head, 
the tongue, teeth, and lips), upon which depend resonance and quality of 
tone, pronunciation, articulation, and a tasteful musical elocution generally. 

Fourth Term. Choir and congregational tunes. Easy Anthems. Songs 
for the School-room. Glees. Scale Exercises calculated to develop even- 
ness, purity, volume, compass, and flexibility of voice. 

Fifth Term. Chromatic Scale. Anthem, Glee, Chorus and Quartette sing- 
ing. Scale Exercises. 

Sixth Term. The higher forms of Glee, Chorus and Quartette singing. 
Solo Singing ; and Solfeggio Singing, involving phrasing, respiration, and 
the higher laws of musical aesthetics. 

Seventh Term. Oratorio and Opera Choruses. Quartette, Solo Singing, 
and Solfeggio practice. The art of Teaching the elements of Music. 

Eighth Term. Oratorio Singing. Solo singing. Solfeggio practice. The 
art of Teaching the elements of Music. Harmony and Musical Composition. 

Ninth Term. Oratorio Singing. The art of Teaching the elements of 
Music, Harmony and Musical Composition. 



DIVISION VII. -Mr. Clover. 

Drawing. In the Department of Drawing, the student commences with the 
use of chalk on the black-board, which exercise, in connection with the use 
of lead-pencil and papei*, is continued throughout the course. 

Beginning simply with vertical and horizontal lines, he learns to draw these 
as nearly perfect as may be, before proceeding in the elements of Geometrv, 

•V ^ 





in forms of angles, squares, circles, etc. This practice is a discipline of the 
mind through the sense of sight, and at the same time gives the hand that fa- 
cility of action which is one of the first requisites in learning to draw, and 
which gradually prepares it to become the willing instrument in embodying 
the conceptions of the mind. 

Instruction in Linear and Arial perspective follows, in which such direc- 
tions are given as enable the student practically to illustrate the Point of 
Light, Line of the Horizon, Base Line, Distance, etc., and to place a square, 
cube, or any given object, in correct perspective in such a manner as will 
prove him to be conversant with the subject. 

Then follow first principles of Drawing as applied to the human head and 
figure — their different proportions, and when seen in different positions, in 
which the laws of perspective are applied and made available in drawing from 
nature. 

And lastly, the principles of perspective as applied in drawing from nature 
animate and inanimate objects, within doors, and in the open fields, clumps 
of trees, rocks, old bridges, buildings, animals, etc. ; and the knowledge and 
practice previously acquired in the various exercises, brought to bear in the 
fuller development of this most interesting and useful study. 

In addition to this, though not strictly in the University course, opportu- 
nity will be afforded to those who may have the time, and desire to avail 
themselves of the opportunity, to receive instruction in water-color and oil 
painting. 






ADMISSION. 

Students seeking admission to the University should make ap- 
plication to the School Commissioner of the county in which they 
reside, and are required, 

(1.) To be, if males, not less than 17, and if females not less 
than 16, years of age. 

(2.) To produce a certificate of good moral character, signed 
by some responsible person. 

(3.) To sign a declaration of their intention to devote them- 
selves to school-teaching in this State, in form as follows : 

" I hereby declare my intention to become a teacher in the schools of this 
State ; and agree that for three years after leaving the University I will re- 
port in writing to the Principal thereof, in June and December of each year, 
where I have been and in what employed." 

(4.) To pass a satisfactory examination, before the proper of- 
ficers (County School Commissioners), in Reading, Spelling, 
Writing, Arithmetic, Geography, and the elements of English 
Grammar. 

EXTRACT FROM THE NORMAL UNIVERSITY ACT. 

Sec. 7. Each County within the State shall be entitled to gratuitous in- 
struction for one pupil in said Normal University, and each Representative 
District shall be entitled to gratuitous instruction for a number of pupils 
equal to the number of representatives in said district, to be chosen in the 
following manner: The School Commissioner in each county shall receive 
and register the names of all applicants for admission to said Normal Uni- 
versity, and shall present the same to the County Court, or in counties act- 
ing under township organization to the Board of Supervisors; which said 
County Court or Board of Supervisors, as the case may be, shall, together 
with the School Commissioner, examine all applicants so presented, in such 
manner as the Board of Education may direct, and from the number of such 
as shall be found to possess the requisite qualifications such pupils shall be 
selected by lot; and in representative districts composed of more than one 
county the School Commissioner and County Judge, or the School Commis- 
sioner and Chairman of the Board of Supervisors in counties acting under 
township organization, as the case may be, of the several counties com- 
posing such representative district, shall meet at the Clerk's office of the 
County Court of the oldest county, and from the applicants so presented to 

^ 



the County Court or Board of Supervisors of the several counties represent- 
ed, and found to possess the requisite qualifications, shall select by lot the 
number of pupils to which said district is entitled. The Board of Education 
shall have discretionary power, if any candidate does not sign and file with 
the Secretary of the Board a declaration that he or she will teach in the 
public schools within this State, in case that engagement can be secured by 
reasonable efforts, to require such candidate to provide for the payment of 
such fees for tuition as the Board may prescribe. 

JggT 1 The time for the admission of students is at the beginning 
of the Fall Term. 



OBJECTS, AND OTHER MATTERS. 

The objects to be attained by the Normal School are stated 
in the fourth section of the charter of incorporation. 

Sec. 4. The object of the said Normal University shall be to qualify teach- 
ers for the common schools of this State, by imparting instruction in the art 
of teaching, in all branches of study which pertain to a common-school edu- 
cation, in the elements of the natural sciences — including agricultural 
chemistry, animal and vegetable physiology, — in the fundamental laws of 
the United States and of the State of Illinois, in regard to the rights and 
duties of citizens, and such other studies as the Board of Education may 
from time to time prescribe. 



" The University Building, now nearly completed, the larg- 
est, most imposing and substantial one of the kind in the country, 
is beautifully situated on a high, rolling prairie," at the junction 
of the Illinois Central and the St. Louis, Alton and Chicago Rail- 
roads, one mile from the limits of the City of Bloomington. 

It was planned under the immediate supervision of the Princi- 
pal, by that accomplished architect, G. P. Randall, Esq., of 
Chicago. The following description of the building gives a very 
fair idea of its internal arrangement: 

"The building is said to be the best, for its purpose in America. Imagine 
yourself in the midst of a, large hall, 10 by so feet, and proportionately high, 
lighted from the north and south, und bounded eastward by a stairway hall, 



S® ' 



ten feet wide, through which, by two flights of easy stairs, the room is ap- 
proached, and across which are four capacious class-rooms ; and bounded 
westward by a similar stairway hall and suit of class-rooms, and you have 
the grouping of the rooms on the Normal-School floor of the State Univer- 
sity. This grouping of the class-rooms around the assembly or study room, 
with ample means of ingress and egress at separate doors, enables a school 
of three hundred pupil teachers to be shifted from room to room without 
confusion, and in the same time that a single class could be moved. The 
double stairways on either side of the main hall — one for the gentlemen 
and one for the ladies — furnish ample means of escape in case of accident 
or fire. 

" Passing down these stairways on to the principal floor, you will find two 
halls running quite through the building, crossing each other in the centre 
at right angles, and terminating in the middle of the sides and ends by ves- 
tibules, outside doors, stairs, etc. The students enter at the east and west 
ends, near which arc their dressing-rooms — which, by the way, are a notice- 
able feature of the edifice. They are large, and fitted up with wash-bowls, 
hat-hooks, mirrors, boxes for rubbers and slippers, and are located close by 
the entrances, so that students in wet weather can exchange their soiled 
boots for slippers before they have passed far enough into the building to 
soil the floors. Visitors enter at the south front, and immediately on pass- 
ing the vestibule find the public reception-room on the right. On the north 
side of the building, on this floor, ranged side by side, are four Model-School 
rooms, intended for fifty pupils each, and for the four grades — Primary, In- 
termediate, Grammar, and High. 

"Passing down one more flight of stairs, you find yourself in what is 
termed the basement, although it is high and mostly above ground. Here 
are the janitor's house, chemical lecture and laboratory rooms, water-closets, 
coal and furnace or boiler rooms. 

"If you will now go back to the second story, or Xormal-School room, 
and ascend still another flight of stairs, you will be greeted with the sight of 
one of the finest halls in the State : it is high, airy, and ample. In this story 
are the debating rooms of the Philadelphian and Wrightonian Societies, the 
Gallery of Art, the Museum of the Illinois Natural History Society, and- the 
Library. Ascend one more flight of stairs, and you reach the floor under the 
roof, some eighty feet from the ground, and will discover two immense water- 
tanks, running nearly across the building, and capable of holding 160 tons 
of water. Pass on, and you wall reach the bell-tower and observatory, af- 
fording a fine view of the city and adjacent prairies. The tower is sur- 
mounted by a dome, elevated forty feet above the roof. 

" The immediate site consists of sixty acres of rolling prairie, which it is 
intended to ornament with every tree which will grow in this latitude. The 
grounds have already been carefully platted, and the tree-planting begun. 
The carrying-out of the idea, of course, must be the work of time." 






STATE NORMAL UNIVERSITY. 




In the conduct of pupils, the great rule of right is insisted 
and relied upon. 



Three Examinations are held annually, as indicated in the 
Calendar, occupying two days each. On the first day the exam- 
inations are written; on the second, oral. 



The Diploma of the University is conferred upon all those 
who shall creditably complete its full course of study and practice. 



There are two Literary Societies, the Philadelphian and 
the Wrightonian, each of which has a well-selected library. Spa- 
cious rooms in the new University edifice have been set apart for 
their especial use. 



The University Library is at present small, and chiefly 
valuable for reference. 



The Apparatus is excellent in quality, and sufficiently ample 
for ordinary purposes of illustration. 



The Museum and Library of the Illinois Natural History So- 
ciety are to be located in the University building, to which the 
pupil teachers will have access, under suitable restrictions. 




Board can be obtained in good families for $2.25 a week, ex- 
clusive of fuel, lights, and washing : when these are furnished 
the usual charge is $3.00 a week. 

W 4 ^J 

bl2 _ ! 




The expense of board is somewhat reduced in ' the clubs ' and 
by self-boarding. 



The following may be considered a near approximation to the 
necessary Expenses for one year, exclusive of pocket-money, ap- 
parel, traveling, and board in vacations. 



Board, 40 weeks, 

Fuel and Lights, 

Books and Stationery, 

Washing, 

Taxes in Societies, etc. 



from $60.00 to $100.00 

7.00 " 15.00 

10.00 " 20.00. 

12.00 " 18.00 

3.00 " 5.00 



Total, 



§92.00 " $158.00 



Tuition is free. 



Text-Books are furnished free for use in the school-rooms ; 
but students are expected to furnish their own books for use at 
home, so that the books belonging to the University may not be 
removed from the building. 

Students are advised to bring with them such books as they 
may have, but not to purchase others until they arrive at the 
University. 



MODEL SCHOOL. 

In the High-School Department of the University the course 
is adapted to fit students for college, for business, or for the Nor- 
mal. Students may be admitted to this department from any 
part of the State by the payment of an annual tuition-fee of 820. 

The Primary, Intermediate and Grammar Departments of the 
Model School are also open to students from all parts of the 
State. Tuition as above. 





CALENDAR FOR 1860-61. 

The School Year of forty weeks is divided into Three Terms. 

The First Term begins Monday, September 17th. Written 
Examination, Wednesday, December 19th. Semi-annual Meet- 
ing of the Board of Education, Thursday, December 20th. Oral 
Examination, Friday, December 21st. 

Vacation of One Week. 

The Second Term begins Monday, December 31st. Writ- 
ten Examination, Wednesday, March 26th. Oral Examination, 
Thursday, March 27th. 

Vacation of One Week. 

The Third Term begins Monday, April 7th. Written Ex- 
amination, Tuesday, July 1st. Annual Meeting of the Board of 
Education, Wednesday, July 2d. Annual Meeting of the Illi- 
nois Natural History Society, Wednesday, July 2d. Oral Exam- 
ination, Thursday, July 3d. Address before the Literary So- 
cieties, Thursday evening, July 3d. Commencement, Friday, 
July 4th. 

Vacation of Ten Weeks. 






1. Ladies' Gymnasium. 

2 and 3. Fuel and Store Rooms 

4. Gentlemen's Gymnasium' 

5, Lecture Room. 



6. Laboratory. 

V. 



8. Janitor's Hon.- 




9, 10, 11, and 12. Model School Rooms. 
13 and 14. pressing-Rooms for Males. 
15. Office of the Board of Education. 



16. Reception Room. 
11 and 18. Dressing-Rooms for Fe- 
males. 




21. Assembly Room for Normal School. 

19, 20, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, and 21. Class Rooms 




28. Museum of the State Natural History Society. 
29 and 30. Society Rooms. 

31. Library, and Gallery of Art. 

32. Main Hall. 

[For further description of the State Normal University Building, seepages 23, 24. 




m. 







APPENDIX. 



TRIENNIAL REGISTER 



1857-1860 






D 





& 




0\ 




BOARD OF EDUCATION. 



PEEK1NS BASS, Esq., Chicago. 
Hon. ST. BATEMAN, Jacksonville. 
GEOEGE BUNSEN, Esq., Belleville. 
Hon. C. B. DENIO, Scales Mound. 
JOHN E. EDEN, Esq., Sullivan. 
Hon. N. W. EDWAEDS, Springfield. 
JOHN J. GILLESPIE, Esq., S'te. Marie. 
CHAS. E. HOVEY, Esq., Bloomington. 
FLAVEL MOSELEY, Esq., Chicago. 
Hon. JOEL S. POST, Decatur. 
Hon. WM. H. POWELL, Springfield. 
GEO. P. EEX, M.D. Perry. 
A. E. SHANNON, Esq., Carmi. 
Hon. WESLEY SLOAN, Golconda. 
W. H. WELLS, Esq., Chicago. 
Prof. DANIEL WILKINS, Bloomington. 
SIMEON WEIGHT, Esq., Kinmundy. 



tor 







"^ 



FACULTY. 



CHAS. E. HOYEY, 

Instructor in the Theory and Art of Teaching. 

IKA MOOEE, 

Instructor in Mathematics. 

CHAELTON T. LEWIS, 

Instructor in Language, One Term. 

CHAUNCEY M. CADY, 

Instructor in Vocal Music. 

CHAUNCEY NYE, 

Instructor in Language, One Term. 

SAMUEL WILLAED, 

Instructor in Language, the Second Year. 

EDWIN C. HEWETT, 

Instructor in History and Geography. 

Miss BETSEY COWLES, 

Instructor in Geography and History, One Tear. 

LEANDEE H. POTTEE, 

Instructor in Language. 

LEWIS P. CLOVEE, 

Instructor in Drawing. 

E. E. EOE, 

Lecturer on Chemistry, One Tear. 

B. G. NOETHEOP, 

Lecturer on Intellectual Philosophy, One Course. 

Miss MAEY M. BEOOKS, 

Instructor in the " Model School ". 









STUDENTS 



LADIES 



Lucy J. Abraham, 
Martha A. Apgar, 
Elizabeth D. Armstrong, 
Elizabeth K. Arnold, 
Kate L. Bacon, 
Clara Baker, 
Mary Baker, 
Hannah C. Bedell, 
Sarah E. Beers, 
Kate Birch, 
M. Louise Boice, 
Ellen J. Boughton, 
Mary I. Boyle, 
Mary Brigham, 
Margaret A. Brown, 
Mary J. Bryant, . 
Kate A. Burtis, 
Philura R. Butler, 
Lizzie Carleton, 
Emily A. Carter, 
Margaret Chalmers, 
Caroline A. Clark, 
Cynthia C. Clarke, 
Marianne Clarke, 
Jane E. Clarkson, . 
Ann It. Collom, . 
Ellen M. Cone, 
Jennie M. Cone, 
Emily Cooke, 

5 





Trivoli, Peoria. 
Lexington, McLean. 
Middletown, Champaign. 
Metamora, Woodford. 
Rosemond, Christian. 
Farmington, Fulton. 
Scott, Ogle. 
Lyons, Cook. 
W. Urbana, Champaign. 
Bloomington, McLean. 

, Will. 

Bloomington, McLean. 
. Clayton Adams. 
Bloomington, McLean. 
Mt. Pleasant, Be Witt. 
Mt. Pleasant, Be Witt. 
Hudson, McLean. 
Kaneville, Kane. 
Griggsville, Pike. 
Perry, Scott. 
Peoria, Peoria. 
Mendota, Lasalle. 
Atlanta, Logan. 
Collinsville, Madison. 
Chicago, Cook. 
Charleston, Coles. 
Farmington, Fidton. 
Farmington, Fulton. 
Kickct/poo, Peoria. 








34 



STATE NORMAL UNIVERSITY. 




Nettie Cornwell, . 
Sophie J. Crist, 
Emeline E. Crocker, 
Mary V. Davison, . 
Fanny S. Denison, 
Amelia A. Denton, 
Minnie Douglass, 
Sarah M. Dunn, 
Lemora J. Ellerton, 
Annie M. English, 
Ellen V. English, 
Frances E. English, 
Martha W. Fay, . 
Sarah E. Fell, 
Ella E. Fisk, 
Mary A. Fuller, 
Marion Goodrich, 
*Ann Goodsell, . 
Sarah F. Gove, 
Amelia A. Gregory, 
Sarah J. Gregory, . 
Helen F. M. Grennell, 
Sarah M. Hanson, . 
Sytheria E. Harkness, 
C. Anna Harwood, 
Martha E. Havens, 
Martha A. Hawkins, 
Harriet E. Hawver, 
Lucretia R. Hite, 
Anne B. Hockaday, 
Anna A. Hubbard, 
Sarah E. Hunter, 
Mary A. Ijams, 
Julia A. Ives, 
Edith F. Johnson, 
Mary E. Jones, . 
Phebe W. Jones, 



* Deceased. 




Morton, Tazewell. 
Blooming ton, McLean. 
Marion, Ogle. 
Bloomington, McLean. 
Peoria, Peoria. 
Joliet, Will. 
Sublette, Lee. 
Bloomington, McLean. 
Marion, Be Witt. 
Bale, McLean. 
Bale, McLean. 
Bale, McLean. 
Bloomington, McLean. 
Bloomington, McLean. 
Bloomington, McLean. 
Tremont, Tazewell. 
Clinton, Be Witt. 
Clear Creek, Alexander. 
New Rutland, Lasalle. 
Trivoli, Peoria. 
Trivoli, Peoria. 
Hudson, McLean. 
Leyden, Cook. 
Elmwood, Peoria. 
Rosemond, Christian. 
Hudson, McLean. 
Sublette, Lee. 
Sycamore, BeKalb. 
Salem, Marion. 
Newport, Lake. 
Toulon, Stark. 
Vermont, Fulton. 
Randolph's Grove. 
Oquawka, Henderson. 
Mendota, Lasalle. 
Hudson, McLean. 
Aurora, Kane. 




~\r- - -- ■■ - ■ ■ ■ ■ - i 


8P 


<4W 


3^ 


ffc] 


STATE NORMAL UNIVERSITY. 35 


Emily Junk, 


Normal, McLean. 


Margaret I. Kerr, . 


. Eureka, Woodford. 


Sarah M. Leal, . 


Friendship, McDonough. 


Julia M. Linsley, 


Galva, Henri/. 


Ellen Luther, 


Peoria, Peoria. 


Martha M. Marble, 


. Bloomington, McLean. 


Annie E. Maxwell, 


Bloomington, McLean. 


Celenda J. McCoy, . 


. Marion, Williamson. 


Maria McCoy, 


Henri/, Marshall. 


Helen L. McCray, 


Woodstock, McHenry. 


Mary J. McKinstry, 


Charleston, Coles. 


Elizabeth J. McMillan, . 


Bloomington, McLean. 


Jane G. Michie, . 


Lyons, Cook. 


Elizabeth J. Mitchell, 


. Bloomington, McLean. 


N. Elizabeth Mitchell, 


Montgomery, Woodford. 


Jane F. Montgomery, 


Bloomington, McLean. 


Caroline Moore, . 


Rushville, Schuyler. 


Mary E. Moore, 


. Rushville, Schuyler. 


Lydia L. Morgan, 


Oswego, Kendall. 


Amanda 0. Noyes, 


Griggsville, Pike. 


Susan Parish, 


Washington, Tazewell. 


Frances A. Peterson, 


Sublette, Lee. 


Henrietta M. Pope, 


Taylorville, Christian. 


Matilda I. Reisinger, 


. Farmington, Fulton. 


Phebe A. Rice, . 


Mendota, Lasalle. 


Faith E. S. Risdon, 


. Decatur, Macon. 


Amanda Roberts, 


Morton, Tazeuell. 


Anna B. Roberts, . 


. Morton, Tazewell. 


Martha E. Roots, 


Tamaroa, Perry. 


Helen A. Ross, 


Vergennes, Jackson. 


Mary J. Scoggan, 


Lee, Brown. 


Lucie Seaton, 


Galesburg, Knox. 


Jennie Sloo, 


Cairo, Alexander. 


Margaret C. Smith, 


. Bloomington, McLean. 


Esther M. Sprague, 


Crete, Will. 


Mary R. Stark, 


Farmington, Fulton. 


Elizabeth Steele, 


Grand ville, Edgar. 


Emelinc Stewart, 


Car mi, White. 


Harriet E. Stewart, 


Hennepin, Putnam. 


3£ 




— i r" - 




36 




STATE NORMAL UNIVERSITY. 



Sarah J. Stewart, 
*Bessie A. Strong, 
Mary Tonilin, 
Sarah E. Town, 
Emma M. Trimble, 
Amanda A. Yancil, 
Elizabeth Wakefield, 
Mary F. Washburn, 
Mary E. Wilderman, 
Rebecca Wilkinson, 
Susan H. Wright, . 
Kate I. Young, 
Lydia M. Young, 
Rebecca L. Zimmerman 
Kate Zorger, . 



Bloomington, McLean. 
Aurora, Kane. 
Charleston, Coles. 
Fitz Henry, Ogle. 
Washington, Tazewell. 
VanciVs Point, Macoupin. 
Heyioorth, McLean. 
Bloomington, McLean. 
Belleville, St. Clair. 
Trivoli, Peoria. 
Hillsboro, Montgomery. 
Bloomington, McLean. 
Scott, Ogle. 



Decatur, Macon. 



GENTLEMEN 



William S. Allen, 
Rufus W. Angell, 
William H. Avery, 
T. L. Bacon, Jr., 
James H. Bailey, 
William C. Baker, 
D. W. Beadle, 
G-eorge M. Berkley 
Lorenzo D. Bovee, 
James M. Burch, 
J. Howard Burnham, 
Ephraim D. Carrothers 
Norris M. Carter, . 
Charles M. Clark, 
Usher F. Clemens, 
Lewis P. Cleveland, 
Charles J. Cowan, . 



* Deceased. 




Havana, Mason. 
Taylorville, Christian. 
Garden Prairie, Boone. 
Rosemond, Christian. 
Carlinville, Macoupin. 
Scott, Ogle. 
Galena, Jo Daviess. 
Sublette, Lee. 
Elwood, Will. 
Bloomington, McLean. 
Barrington, Cook. 
Tamaroa, Perry. 
Hudson, McLean. 
Aledo, Mercer. 
Metropolis City, 3Iassac. 
Arlington, Bureau. 
Oquawha, Henderson. 










STATE NORMAL UNIVERSITY. 37 




John T. Curtiss, 


Otter Creek, Jersey. 




Valentine Denning, 


. Hudson, McLean. 




Robert L. Duncan, 


Keithsburg, Mercer. 




William H. Durham, 


Genoa, DeKalb. 




James H. Dutton, 


Metamora, Woodford. 




W. J. 0. Fishburn, 
Edwin B. Fisk, . 






Dale, McLean. 




William H. H. Fuller, . 


Oquawka, Henderson. 




James R. Fyffe, 


Magnolia, Putnam. 




Enoch A. G-astman, Jr., . 


. Hudson, McLean. 




Francis M. Grastman, . 


Hudson, 31cLean. 




William G-essner, 


. Mt. Pulaski, Logan. 




Cary Judson Grill, 


Toulon, Stark. 




E. Aaron Grove, 


. New Rutland, Lasalle. 




William D. Hall, 


Vermillion, Lasalle. 




Peter Harper, 


Peoria, Peoria. 




Ebenezer D. Harris, 


Lenox, Warren. 




Silas Hayes, Jr., 


Blooming ton, McLean. 




William W. Higgins, . 


Bloomington, McLean. 




Luke H. Hite, 


Salem, Marion. 




John M. House, 


Riclwiew, Washington. 




Joseph Gr. Howell, . 


. Duncanton, White. 




John Hull, 


Salem, Marion. 




Duncan Gr. Ingraham, 


Carlinville, Macoupin. 




Charles D. Irons, 


Peoria, Peoria. 




Albert J. Ives, 


Oquawka, Henderson. 




H. W. Johnson, . 


Marion, Williamson. 




James E. Johnson, 
Fred. B. Jones, 






Lacon, Marshall. 




Abraham B. Keagle, 


Butler, Montgomery. 




Matthew R. Kcll, 


Salem, Marion. 




L. Beecher Kellogg, 


. Mcllcnry, Mc Henry. 




Henderson W. Kester, 


Oxbow, Putnam. 




John D. Kiikpatrick, 


Tiskilwa, Bureau. 




William T. Law, 


Magnolia, Putnam. 




Albert W. Lecrone, 


Ewingtony Effingham. 




Levi L. Lightner, 


Thebes, Alexander. 




Jehu Little, .... 


. Marshall, Clark. 




Mil us M. Livesay, 


Richvicw, Washington. 




w 






38 




STATE NORMAL UNIVERSITY. 



Walter F. Locker, . 
Peter J. C. Marion, 
Samuel L. Marshall, 
Davis W. Miller, 
John B. Miller, 
Andrew T. Mitchell, 
Moses I. Morgan, 
William W. Murphy, 
Gould Hyde Norton, 
Henry B. Norton, 
Marvin J. Nye, 
Hermes S. Payn, 
George Peter, 
Edwin Philbrook, 
Henry H. Pope, 
Henry C. Prevost, 
Daniel B. Puffer, . 
James F. Ridlon, 
Thomas M. Roberts, 
George B. Robinson, 
Logan H. Roots, 
Byron Sheldon, . 
Justin S. Spaulding, 
N. D. Stephens, . 
John H. Thompson, 
Edwin Waite, 
J. R. Walker, 
Peleg R. Walker, 
William H. Walker, 
John Walton, 
W. W. Washburn, 
John W. Watts, 
W. B. Webber, . 
Theophilus T. Willis, 
Charles W. Wills, 
John X. Wilson, 
Benjamin F. Wood, 



Taylorville, Christian. 
French Village, St. Clair. 
McLeansboro, Hamilton. 
Jonesboro, Union. 
Jonesboro, Union. 
Dale, McLean. 
Naperville, DuPage. 
Mt. Pleasant, De Witt. 
Scott, Ogle. 
Scott, Ogle. 
Waukegan, Lake. 
Garden Prairie, Boone. 
Millstadt, St. Clair. 
Vandalia, Fayette. 
Taylorville, Christian 
Blooming ton , McLean. 
Mt. Palatine, Putnam. 
Monmouth, Warren. 
Morton, Tazewell. 
McLeansboro, Hamilton. 
Tamaroa, Perry. 
Rushville, Schuyler. 
Metamora, Woodford. 
Lee Centre, Lee. 
Normal, McLean. 
Sycamore, DeKalb. 
Havana, Mason. 
Lindenwood, Ogle. 
Bloomington, McLean. 
Augusta Hancock. 
Dement, Ogle. 
Hope, Lasalle. 
Urbana, Champaign. 
Richview, Washington. 
Canton, Fulton. 
Bloomington, McLean. 
Canton, Fulton. 






STATE NORMAL UNIVERSITY. 



39 






SUMMARY. 

Ladies, 120 

Gentlemen, 93 

Total, 213 









iLLiisro 



IS 



«\ «l 



oimtal Wvlimtlty. 



1861-62. 




BLOOMINGTON, ILL.: 

PRINTED AT Till) DAILY PANTAGRAPH PRINTING HOUSE. 

1862. 



CATALOGUE 



OF THE 



Jtatt Ifotnuil %titn^itg t 



ACADEMIC YEAR 



Ending June 27th, 1869. 



BLOOMINGTON, ILL.: 

PRINTED \T THE DAILY PANTAGBAFH PAINTING HOUSE 

L862 



BOARD OF EDUCATION 



STATE OF ILLINOIS! 



Hon. S. W. MOULTON, Shelbyville, President. 
Hon. NEWTON BATEMAN, ex off. a member and Secretary. 
PERKINS BASS, Esq., Chicago. 
Hon. HARMAN G. REYNOLDS, Knoxmlle. 
Hon. JOEL S. POST, Decatur. 
Hon. WM. H. POWELL, Springfield. 
GEO. P. REX, M. D., Pern/. 
A. R. SHANNON, Esq., Carmi. 
Hon. WESLEY SLOAN, Gohonda. 
WM. H. WELLS, Esq., Chicago. 
SIMEON WRIGHT, Esq., Kinmundy. 
Hon. THOMAS J. PICKETT, Rock Island. 
•J. W. SHEAITAN, Esq., Chicago. 
Hon. WILLIAM H. GREEN, Metropolis. 
CALVIN GOUDY, M. 1)., Taylorville. 



C. VV. HOLDER, Esq., Bloominoion, Ti 






FACULTY 

For the Year Ending June 27th, 1862, 



PERKINS BASS, Principal, 

Instructor in Mental Science and La -.vs. 

EDWIN C. HEWETT, 

Instructor in Geography and History. 

JOSEPH A. SEWALL. 

Instructor in Natural Science. 

* JOHN HULL, 

Instructor in Mathematics. 

f RICHARD EDWARDS. 

Instructor in Didactics and Literature. 

CHARLES F. GUILDS, Principal of Model Sch< 
B. E. MESSER. 

Instructor in Vocal Music and Drawing. 

CHARLES D. WILBER, 

Instructor in Geology. 

MARGARET E. OSBAND. 

Instructress in English Grammar. 

FRANCES A. PETERSON. 

Instructress in Mathematics and Latin. 

LIVONIA E. KETCIIAM. 

Teacher in Primary Department Model School. 



HENRY B. NORTON. 
MARION GOODRICH. 
MARY E. BAKER. 



Teachers in Model School 
during Fall Term. 



* First two Terms 
t Last Term. 



I i 



PRESENT FACULTY, 

( PERMANENTLY ORGANIZED. ) 



RICHARD EDWARDS, Principal 

Instructor in Mental Science and Didactics. 

EDWIN C. IIEWETT, 

Instructor in Geography and History. 

JOSEPH A. SEWALL, 

Instructor in Natural Science. 

*LEANDER II. POTTER. 

Instructor in Language. 

I THOMAS METCALF, 

Instructor in Mathematics. 

MARGARET E. OSBAND, 

Instructress in Grammar and Drawing 



MOD E L SC II OOL 



CHARLES F. CHILDS, Principal 
LIVONIA E. KETCHAM 

Teacher of Primary Depart] 



krmy, bu( ia to return before the beginning >f the School Y 
Sainl Louis Rigo Si 




STUDENTS. 



SENIOR CLASS. 



Sarah Elizabeth Beers. 
Elizabeth ( larleton, 
Helen Frances GrenneU, 
Esther Maria Sprague, 
Emma M. Trimble, - 



Fountain Green, Hancock 
Griggsmlle, Pike. 
Normal, McLean. 
Crete, Will. 
Washington, Tazewell. 



Lorenzo l>'>\\ Bovee, 
James Frederic Ridlon, 

Logan Holt Roots. 

• R5. 



Elwood, WUl. 
Monmouth, Wai r< n 
Tamaroa, Perry. 



STATE 


NORMAL UNIVERSITY. 7 


MIDDLE GLASS. 




SECTION 


A. 


Mary A. Fuller, - 


. - 


Tremont, Tazewell. 


Julia A. Ives, - 


- 


Blooming/ton, McLea n . 


Martha M. Marble, 


- 


Bloomington, McLea n . 


John H. Thompson, 


- 


Normal, McLean. 




SECTION B. 


Abbie E. Reynolds, 


- 


Griggsville, Pike. 


Margaret C. Smith, 


- 


Bloomington, McLean. 


Sarah A. Stevenson 


- 


Polo, Ogle. 


George Colvin, - 


_ 


Bloomington, Mr Lean. 


W. Dennis Hall, - 


- 


Vermilion, Lasalle. 


L. Beecher Kellogg, 


- 


McHenry, McHenry. 




SUCTION 


a 


Mary J. Brow n, 


- 


Barn/, Pike. 


Susan Daniels, 


- 


Grafton, McHenry. 


Ellen V. English, 


- 


Vale, M<- km a. 


Sarah P. Gove, - 


- 


New Rutland, Lasalh . 


Susan A. Pike, 


- 


Bloomington, McLean. 


Eliza A. Sticking , 


- 


Ton Ion. Shirk. 


Missouri Whit<\ 


- 


Bloomington, McLeaw, 


Edwin F. Bacon, 


. 


I', miii. Peoria. 


Albert E. Bower, - 


- 


Lasalle, Lasalle. 


William ( lessner, 


- 


Ml. Pulaski, Logan. 


James. T. Judd, - 


- 


( 'arlinville, Macoupin. 


Philo A. Marsh, 


. 


Metamora, Woodford. 


Truman J. Pearce, 


- 


Normal, McLean. 


< >. ( lorwin Sabin, 


- 


Stoufs Grove, McLean. 


Middle Class, 


set ill students \ 


24. 


The Mi. Mir Class compr 


vho have advanced beyond Hie studies 


of the hirst year. 


# 





STATE NORMAL UNIVERSITY. 



Sarah M. Bergen, 
Elizabeth Brigham, 
Harriet E. Dunn, 
Elizabeth Ellington, 
Anna P. Grennell, 
Emma A. Hoyt, 
Mary Kingman, - 
Margaret McCambridge, 
Charlotte C. Minkler, - 
Mary E. Pearee, 
Adra A. Stiles, 
Lydia J. Tilton, 
Bandusia Wakefield, 
Eleanora W. Yeager, 

William A. Black, 
John Gilwee, 
John F. Gowdy, - 
William F. Gowdy, 
Robert M. Kenney, - 
Andrew M. McClure, - 
Orange Parret, 
Charles W. Rearden, • 
Charles E. Smith. - 
Henry K. Smith. - 
John IL Walker, 



JUNIOR CLASS. 

SECTION A. 

- Joliet 



SECTION B. 



Emma Barnard. 
Emma C. Barrett, 
Flora C. Bolan. 



wui. 

Bloomington, Mc Lean . 
Bloomington, McLean . 

Cairo. Alexander. 
Normal, McLean. 
Spring-field, Sangamon. 
Tremont, Tazewell. 
Normal, McLean. 

Lane, Ogle. 

Normal, McLean. 

Lane, Ogle. 
Bloomington, McLean. 
DeWitt, DeWitt. 
ShelbymUe, Shelby. 

Sacramento, White. 

Centralia, Mario,/. 
Biggsville, Henderson. 
Monmouth, Warren. 
Griggsville, Pike. 

Marshall, Clark. 

Magnolia, Putnam. 

Car mi. White. 
Henr;/, Marshall. 
Magnolia, Putnam. 
Wenona, Marshall. 

Griggsville, Pike. 

Rock Island, Pock Island. 

Cairo, Alexander. 



* The Junior Class comprises all students who have completed the studies of tin 

First Year, or less. 



STATE NORMAL 


UNIVERSITY, 9 


Mary J. Bryant, 


Normal, McLean. 


Harriet M. Butterfield. 


- Magnolia, Putnam. 


Sophia C. Elkins, 


Bloomington, McLean. 


Matilda S. Frazier, 


- Viola, Mercer. 


Ann E. Hilton, 


Port Byron, R. Island. 


Mary C. Hudson, 


- Earlville, Lasalle. 


Isabella Moore, 


Perry, Pike. 


Mary Alice Kearden, - 


- Shawneetown, Gallatin. 


Virginia C. Ripley, - 


Belleville, St. Clair. 


Louise M. Scott, 


- Princeton, Bureau. 


Mary A. Shinn, 


Griggsville, Pike. 


Abbio Smith, 


- Bloomington, McLean. 


Amanda 0. Sparks, 


Rushville, Schuyler. 


Catharine R. Stine, 


- Bloomington, McLean. 


Eliza Stone, 


Versailles, Brown. 


Mary L. Walker, 


- Bardolph, McDonougli. 


Fanny J. Waterman, 


Moline, Rock Island. 


Juliette White, 


- Greenville, Bond '. 


Robert A. Bower, Jr., 


Lasalle, Lasalle. 


Wilson McChalfant, - 


- Magnolia, Putnam. 


Elmer F. Clapp, 


Morris, Grundy. 


Peter T. Crist, 


- Bloomington, McLean. 


Jacob 11. Fishburn, - 


El Paso, Woodford. 


Otho II. Ilibbs, - 


- Kappa, Woodford. 


Do Witt C. Iloyt, - 


Springfield, Sangamon. 


Aquila Janney, ... 


- Prairie City, McDonougli. 


Clark Leal, 


Fountain Green, Hancock. 


Milus M. Livesay, 


- Rich view, Washington. 


Joseph Malcom, 


Salem, Marion. 


Joseph R. McGregor, - 


- Earlville, Lasalle. 


Daniel W. Norris, 


Quiuey, Adams. 


James (!. Pearee, 


- Normal, Me Lean. 


Noah II. Pike, - 

2 


Bloomington, Me Lean. 



Samuel D. Scholes, 
John W. Stearns, 
William A. H. Tilton, 
J. William Wierman, 
Cyrus I. Wilson, - 
Arthur P. Wood, 

Mary M. Abbott, 
Charlotte B. Cook, 
Amanda E. Frazier, 
Mary E. Hebbard, - 
Mary J. Hunter, - 
Hannah Kcnncr, 
Anna J. Kinley, - 
Camilla S. Kinney, - 
Anna M. Kitchell, 
Clarissa R. Lewis, 
Ella E. Mercer, - 
Clara Miller, - 
Abbie Muench, - 
Martha W. Rex, 
Elizabeth M. Rowley, 
Mary W. Smith, 



- Chillicothe, Peoria. 
La Harpe, Hancock. 

- Bloomington, McLean. 
Magnolia, Putnam. 

- Bloomington, McLean. 
Bloomington, McLean. 

SECTION C. 

- Bloomington, McLean. 
Bloomington, McLean. 

- Viola, Mercer. 

New Rutland, Lasalles. 

- Bockforrf. Winnebago. 
Flora, Clay. 

- Aurora, Kane 
Bloomington, McLean. 

- Bloomington, McLean, 
NbrmalflMcL 

- Peoria, Peoria. 
Flora, Clay. 

- Decatur, Macon. 
Perry, Pike. 

- Bloomington, McLean. 
Magnolia, Putnam. 



Zilpha Vandercook, 


- Rochford, Winnebago. 


Henrietta Worley, 


Pekin, Tazewell. 


Emma Yates, 


- GHggsville, Pike. 


Irving H. Bakewell, 


Normal, McLean. 


Eugene F. Baldwin, 


- Bloomington, McLean. 


Thomas J. Burrill, - 


Davis; Stephenson. 


Philo A. Clark, - 


- Decatur, Macon. 


Horace B. Cole, 


Amboy, Lee. 


John H. Crandall, 


- Morton, Tazewell. 


Charles H. Crandell, 


Magnolia, Putnam. 



Jesse Cunningham, 
John A. Davis, - 
Henry B. Funk, 
William W. Hall, - 
Charles Hayes, 
Francis D. Herman, 
Jehu Kenner, 
Edward Kingsley, 
Thomas N. Lakin, 
Joseph Mendes, 
William B. McClintock, 
Oscar F. McKim, 
Samuel D. McPherson, 
Kobert L. Mudd, 
Jacob J. Parker, 
James P. Rice, 
Thomas B. Rinehart, - 
John II. Robey, 
Charles Rogers, 
Frederic J. Seybold, 
James Henry Smith or, - 
Samuel T. Smither, 
Jasper M. Stine, 
Francis F. Tucker, - 
AVillirfm Tunstead, 
George B. Walker, 
John W. Watts, 
Juniors, 



- Beverly, Adams. 
Petersburg, Menard. 

- Lynnville, Morgan. 
Shelbyville, Shelby. 

- Chicago, Cook. 
Larkinsburg, Clay. 

- Flora, Clay. 
Davis, Stephenson. 

- Rosemond, Christian. 
Springfield, Sangamon. 

- Shelbyville, Shelby. 
Dallas City, Henderson. 

- Cooper's, Brown. 
Terre Haute, Henderson. 
Vermont, Fulton. 
Havanna, Mason. 

- Ewington, Effingham. 
Kappa, Woodford. 

- Kickapoo, Peoria. 
Lasalle, Lasalle. 

- Rushville, Schuyler. 
Rushville, Schuyb r. 

- Bloomvngton, McLean. 
FA I'u so, Wood/brd. 

- Petersburg^ Menard. 
Clarion, Bureau. 

- Hope, Lasalle. 
L20. 



PUPILS OF THE MODEL SCHOOL. 



Grammar and High School Departments. 

Joshua Baily, Detavan 

Charles E. Bakcwell, --..-- Normal 

Rollin Bemiss, - Bloomington. 

George S. Benton, Normal. 

William II. Bishop, - Bloomington. 

Luther Bishop, v - - v Bloomington. 

George Brad nor, .... Bloomington. 

William. Brown, - Delavan. 

Edward W. Clark, - Chicago. 

George P. Clough, Normal. 

James E. Coe, Bloomington 

Howard C. Crist, Bloomington, 

Henry Duval, Mackinaw. 

Eli Evans, Normal. 

J. Comley Fell, Normal. 

Samuel M. JToss, -• - - - Bloomington. 

Benjamin F. Fyffc, ... - Magnolia. 

Thomas J. Hawks, - Bloomington. 

Charles B. Holmes, - Normal. 

Hosea Howard, - - - - - Bloomington. 

Charles M. Howard, ... - Bloomington. 

Eichard Huxtable, Panola. 

Aaron Karr, Heyworth. 

Henry L. Karr, Heyworth. 

Ambrose Lee, Bloomington. 

Charles Luce, ------ Bloomington. 

William McCambridge, ... Normal. 

William Marble, ----- Bloomington. 

William F. Matthews, - Bloomington. 



STATE NORMAL UNIVERSITY. 



13 



Jeremiah Matthews, --,.«,.- Lincoln. 

Cassius Niccolls, ----- Bloomington. 

Luther Pardee, Bloomington, 

Myron J. Peterson, - Sublette. 

James A. Head, ----- Decatur. 

Samuel T. Kowley, - Bloomington. 

S. Howard Soule, ----- JJllin. 

Charles E. Sprague, - Normal. 

Henry L. Strock, ----- Polo. 

Parke E. Temple, - Bloomington. 

Henry E. Thayer, Bloomington. 

Frank W. Tucker, El Paso. 

Oscar "Wakefield, - - - - Bloomington. 

James H. Walton, - Bloomington. 

Oliver F. White, ----- Bloomington. 

FEMALES. 

Selina Bakewcll, Normal. 

Minnie A. Benedict, - Bloomington , 

Winona S. Branch, El Paso. 

Anna C. Bryant, Normal. 

Dora Bryant, - - - - * - Normal. 

Josephine Bryant, Normal. 

Gertrude Case, Normal. 

Hannah Case, Normal. 

Emma Crist, Bloomington. 

Emma S. Deal, Normal. 

Eliza J. Dugan, Magnolia. 

Eliza B. Fell, Normal. 

Clara V. Fell, Blooming/ <-n 

Mary A. Fell, Norma!. 

Beatrice Fyffc, Normal. 

Flora V. Jones, Bloomington. 

Mary E. Matthews, - Bloomington. 

Sarah K. Mulkins, Wenona. 



14 



STATE NORMAL UNIVERSITY. 



Nellie O'Brien, Bloomington. 

Loretta B. Sibert, Normal. 

Mary E. Stewart, - Normal. 

Anna M. Tucker, Kappa. 

Fannie E. Vreeland, - Bloomington. 

Mary White, Bloomington* 

Sallie A. Wright, - Normal. 

Mary M. Younger, Magnolia. 

Primary and Intermediate Departments. 
MAL.ES. 

Ford Allen, Bloomington. 

Lind Allen, Bloomington. 

Charles Ames, Blooming I on. 

lleuben Allen, Normal. 

Thomas Bryant, Normal. 

Myron Colman, Normal. 

Noble Crothers, Bloomington. 

Carey Draper, Bloomington, 

Willie Dodge, Normal. 

John W. Deal, Normal. 

Eugene Fell, ----- Normal. 

Charles Gallop, Normal. 

Frank Gallop, Normal. 

Charles Gowdy, Bloomington. 

James Gilbert, Bloomington. 

Thomas Hayse, Bloomington. 

Frank Holmes, NormaL 

Edward Hiett, Norm"!. 

Thomas Hiett, ----- Normal. 

Albert Kitchell, - - - - - Bloomington. 

James Landagan, .... Normal. 

Edwin Landagan, - - - - ' - Normal. 

Edwin McCartey, ... - Normal. 

Albert Niccolls, ----- Bloomington. 



Frank Pardee, 
Melville Phoenix, 
Frederick Phoenix, 
Samuel Phoenix, 
David Eeecler, 
Eddie Iieaves, 
John Roney, 
Andrew Sibert, 
Ezra Sprague, 
Hamilton Spencer, 
Hurd Thompson, 
Addison Taylor, 
Elisha Wright, 



Blooming Ion. 

Normal. 

Normal. 

Normal. 

Normal. 

Normal. 

Normal. 

Normal. 

Normal. 

Bloomingion. 

Bloom ingion. 

Blooming t on. ( 

Normal. 



FEMALES. 

Margaret Allen, Normal. 

Siota Allen, Normal. 

Mary Bakewell, Normal. 

Sevilla Case, Normal. 

Florence Case, Normal. 

Laura Colman, - - - - v - Bloominyton. 

Nora Deal, J - Normal. 

Clara Evans, Normal. 

Alice Fell, Normal. 

Rachael Fell, - Normal. 

Sarah J. Gallop, Normal. 

Mary Holmes, ------- Normal. 

Nellie Holmes, Normal. 

Eliza Hunter, Normal. 

(Mara Holmes, Normal. 

Mary Lee, Normal. 

Nettie Messer, Norm 

Mary Moore, Nor lira I. 

Emma North, Normal. 



16 



STATE NORMAL UNIVERSITY. 



Winnie Roney, 
Mary Reeder, 
Sarah Reeder, - 
Jane Sprague, 
Fanny Sprague, 
Emma Trowbri dge, 
Louisa Taylor, - 



Normal. 
Normal. 
Normal. 
Normal. 
Normal. 
Normal. 
Norm n! 



SUMMARY. 

ladit. ; Gentlemen. Whole No. 
Senior Class, ------- 5 3 8 

Middle Class. I:; 11 24 

•I i m..k Class, - - 54 M L20 

Total. ------- 72 80 152 

*MODEL SCHOOL. 

HIGHER DEPARTMEl 

Females, 2G; Males, 44; Whole No., 70 

PRIMARY DEPARTMENT. 

Females, 26 ; Males, 37 ; Whole NTq„ 

Total, 

Grand Total, 285 



* Fur the Second ami Third Terms Only. 















STATE 


NORMAL UNIVERSITY. 17 




s 

i 






, 


Course of Study. 

TABULAR VIEW. 


1st Year. 


2d Year. 


3d Year. 






1 | 2 | 3 


4 | 5 | 6 


7 ! 8 | 9 


Terms, 


X 

o 


d 

CO 


4 
2 i 


d 


6 

M 


C<1 


G 


6 


d' 


® 

15 
51 
13 
12 
93 
28 
12 
28 
15 
12 
40 
28 
13 
13 
12 
15 
12 
28 
28 
so 
15 
25 


I 

II 

III 

IV 
V 

VI 

VII 

c 
g 

E 


I Metaphysics 




1 

! 


* 






1 


Hist, and Methods of Educ. 
Coustitut'ns of U. S. and 111. 

School Laws of Illinois 

English Language 


H 

i 






•:- 




* 








• 


1 1 

1 j 






1 


1 


* 




* 


* 






* 






* 


* 


1 
















— 


-|- 


* 


* 





1 1 


Geometry 


1 1 


Natural Philosophy 




| 





— 


— 


* 


Book-Keeping 




| 




M 




* 




* 














TT 


Vstronoiny 




i 












| | 


Botany 












* 


if 






i 












1 








I I- 




* 


* 






• 


:■ 


. |. 




Writing and Drawing 




* 


• 


• 


• 


* 


* 


* * 1 * 


* 


* * 




* 


* 


• 1 I 






1 


•1 












| 






• 


* 






3 













COURSE OF STUDY. 



The Divisions I, II, III, etc., in the foregoing Table, are made 
with reference rather to the studies in charge of different teachers 
| than to a strictly logical grouping of subjects-. The annexed s\'L- 
lariis is intended as a Key to the table. 



DIVISION I. 

Metaphysics. Fourth Term. Mental Philosophy precede? and is made the basis 
of instruction in the Theory and Art of Teaching. It comprises: (1.) An explication 
of terms. (2.) A general inquiry into the nature of mind : What is it? What are its 
Facts, Laws, and Results ? The facts and laws of Knowledge, Feeling, and Exertion ? 
(3.) A more particular study of Consciousness, Perception, Memory. Imagination, and 
the Reflective and Regulative Powers. (4.) The Feelings. Theory of Pleasure and 
Pain. 

Theory and Art of Teaching. The Third, Sixth, Seventh and Ninth Terms are 
occupied, in this department, with the study of the Science, Methods and History of 
Education. The course of necessity takes a somewhat wide range, so that only a part 
of the topics can here he enumerated. (1.) The Order, in time, of the Development 
of the Mental Faculties, and the exercises best adapted to encourage their growth. 
The special purpose of each faculty, and the means to train it. Relation of the Mind 
to the Body, and the effect of the vigorous exercise of each upon the other. Laws of 
Bodily Health. Ventilation; Posture; Gymnastics; Formation of Courses of Study. 
(2.) Motives. The incentives which a teacher may allow to act upon himself or his 
pupils. The Conscience— how it should be educated. (3.) The Organization and 
Classification of Schools. Programme of Daily Exercises. The Recitation. School 
Government. (4.) History of Systems and Methods of Education. Biographies of 
Eminent Teachers. (5.) Drill Exercises in Teaching. Observation and Practice in 
the Model School. General Teaching Exercises before the Normal School. 

Eighth Term. ' The Constitutions of the United States and of the State of Illinois. 
Duties of Teachers as Citizens. 

Ninth Term. The School Laws of Illinois. School Supervision and Management. 
School-House Architecture. Practice in the Model School. General Exercises in the 
Normal School, 



DIVISION II. 

Reading. First Term. Analysis of Words according to their elementary sounds. 
Articulation and Pronunciation. Compass and Flexibility of Voice. Analysis of 
Words according to their derivation and formation. 



STATE NORMAL UNIVERSITY. 19 



Grammar. Second Term. Etymology during the first half of the term. Aim to 
teach the office of each part of speech in the construction of sentences. Critical Pars- 
ing. During the last half of the term, Construct, Analyze, and Parse, sentences of 
various kinds. Daily exercise throughout the term in the Correction of False Syntax- 

Third Term. Analysis and Construction of Sentences continued. Puiles of Syntax. 
Capitalization. Consideration of Abridged Propositions and Idiomatic Forms and 
Constructions. Daily exercise in the Correction of False Syntax. 

Rhetoric. Fourth Term. Formation of the English Language. Literary Taste. 
Figurative Language. Style and its varieties. Punctuation. Composition, Analysis 
and Amplification of subjects. 

Reading. Fifth Term. Modulation. Prosody. Composition read once a week 
during the term. 

Literary Criticism. Sixth Term. Examine the style of the best English Authors 
of different periods. Study particularly the style of Milton, Addison, Goldsmith, etc. 
Blair's Rhetoric. Compositions during the term. 

Eighth Term. History of English Literature. Rise and Development, in England 
and America, of Poetry, History, R-omance, the Essay, Oratory, and Metaphysics. — 
Principal Authors in each department. Newspapers, Reviews, and Magazines. Eng- 
lish Literature compared with that of other nations. Orations and Essays written 
weekly, and delivered or read in the presence of all the students. 



DIVISION III. 

Arithmetic. First Term. The Decimal System : including Decimal Fractions, so 
called. Factoring, and its application to Common Multiples and Divisors. Fractions. 
Compound Numbers. 

Second Term. Ratio and Proportion. Percentage, with its application to Loss and 
Gain, Commission, Insurance, etc. Percentage with time, including Interest, Dis- 
count, Partnership, and Equation of Payments. Exchange (Inland and Foreign).— 
Extract ion of Second and Third Roots of Numbers. Arabic method of Notation, using 
bases other than 10 ; applied particularly to Duodecimals. 

Algebra, Third Term,. Algebraic Notation. Factoring, with application to Di- 
visors and Multiples. Fractions. Equations of First Degree. Extraction of the 
Roots of Algebraic quantities. Rules deduced for the extraction of the Roots ofNum« 
hers. Radicals. 

Fourth Term (Optional). Equations of Second Degree. Ratio and Proportion. Se- 
ries: including the Progressions, Binomial Expansion Permutation, Undetermined 
Coefficii nis. .Methods t ii' interpolation, and the methods >f Summing Special Forms ; 
Piling of Balls and Shells. Logarithms, with .Methods of Computing Hie Tables. Ex- 
ponential Equations, with Position. Interest and Annuities. 

Geometry. Fourth Term. Straight Line, and Surfaces bounded by Straight Lines. 
The Circle. Extra Theorems and Problems given for demonstration and solution. 

Fifth Term. Solids bounded by Planes. The Cylinder. The Cone. Surface and 
Solidity of sphere. Plane Trigonometry, with iis application to Land Surveying. 
Leveling. Variation of Magnetic Needle. 

Eighth and Ninth Terms (Optional). Equations of Point, Right Lines and Circle. 
Equations of Point, Right Lines, and Plane, inSphere. Equations of Cylinder and 
Cone. General Equation of Conic Section referred to its own Plane. General Equa- 
tion of Second Degree between two Variables. Loci. Surfaces of Revolution. Dif- 
ferential Calculus. Integral Calculus. 

Physios. Seventh Term. Laws of Motion and Mechanics. Hydrostatics and EIj 
draulics. Pneumatics, optics. Electricity ami Magnetism. 



20 STATE NORMAL UNIVERSITY, 



DIVISION IV. 

Geography. First Term. (1.) General Principles of Geography : Execution of 
Maps, and Outline of South America, 15 lessons; Andes Mountains and countries 
containing them, 13 lessons: remaining countries of South America, 5 lessons ; 
Cities of South America, 5 lessons ; Review, 5 lessons. Total for South America, 43 
lessons. (2.) Outline and Map of North America, 5 lessons; Russian and British Amer- 
ica. 5 lessons; New England and New York. 12 lessons. Astronomical Geography, 
Latitude and Longitude, Day and Night, the Seasons, etc., 5 lessons. Review, 5 lessons. 

Second Term. (1.) Remaining States and Territories of the United States, 22 les- 
sons ; Mexico, Central America, etc.. 5 lesions: Review, 3 lessons. Total for North 
America, 52 lessons. (2.) Outline and Map of Europe. 5 lessons ; Mountains and Riv- 
ers of the Continent, 5 lesson* ; Rapid glance at the countries of the Continent, 10 
lessons; More thorough study of Britain as a model, 10 lessons; Review, ;"> lessons. 
Total for Europe, 35 lessons. 

Sixth Term. (1.) Outline and Map of Asia, 5 lessons; Mountains and Rivers of 
Asia, 5 lessons; Countries aud Cities, 10 lessons: Total for Asia, 20 lessons. (2.) Phys- 
ical Geography. Review of the Earth's Forms, with a sketch of the Theory of its 
Origin, 10 lessons; Physical Life of the Earth, Temperature. Atmospheric and Marine 
Currents; Rains, and the Effects of Climatic Conditions on Vegetable and Animal 
Life, 12 lessons. Historical View of the Earth : the Relations of its Forms and Phys- 
ical Life to the Development of the Human Race, 8 lessons : Review, 10 lessons. To- 
tal for Ph3 T sical Geography, 40 lessons. 

United States History. Fourth Term. Voyages, Discoveries, and Indian Tril.es, 
10 lessons; Colonial History. 15 lessons: French War and Revolution, 20 lessons ; 
Subsequent History, with a special study of Illinois, 15 lessons: Review, 15 lessons. 
Text-Book— Willson. 

Ancient History. Fifth Term. One Term (13 weeks); 65 Lessons. Early Asiatic 
Nations, 8 lessons ; Grecian History, 12 lessons; Roman History, 15 lessons: Most 
Prominent Events of the Middle Ages. 10 lessons: Britons, •"> lessons ; Review. l-"> les- 
sons. Text-Book— Weber. 

Astronomy. Eighth Term. Definitions, with Oral Lessons and Exercises. 5 les- 
sons ; Constellations, with Maps , ,f the Heavens, 15 lessons; Refraction, Parallax, 
Time, the Seasons, Motions, Distances and Orbits of Planets. 15 lesson.", Gesieral De- 
scription of the Solar System. 15 lessons: Eclipses and Tides, 5 lessons ; Review. It) 
lessons. Total, 65 lessons. Text-Books— Robinson's a u.J Burritt's. 

DIVISION V. 

Chemistry. Fifth Term. Names and Properties of Elements: Symbols: Formu- 
lae; Chemical Affinity, etc. Laws of Definite Proportions. Behavior of Chemical 
Bodies toward each other. Changes of Form, Color, Properties. Air, Water, Light, — 
their relations to organic life. Organic Chemistry. Food of Plants. Outline of 
Chemical Analysis, qualitative and quantitative. Philosophy of Chemistry. 

Botany. Sixth Term. Structure of Plants. Mode of Growth, etc. Their relations 
to each other. Classification. Systems of Analysis, Natural and Linnsean. Written 
Analysis of at least seventy-live species of native plants by the Natural system. 

Anatomy and Physiology. Seventh Term. General View of the Structure and 
Functions of the Human Body. Food and the Digestive Process. The Blood : its 
Chemical Composition and Vital Properties. Respiration and Nutrition. The Nerv- 
ous System. The Laws of Hygiene. 

Zoology. Ninth Term. The Sphere and Fundamental Principles of Zoology. — 
General Properties of Organized Bodies. Functions and Organs of Animal Life. In- 
telligence and Instinct. Metamorphoses of Animals. Geographical Distribution of 
Animals. 



STATE NORMAL UNIVERSITY. 21 



ADMISSION. 

Students seeking admission to the University should make ap- 
plication to the School Commissioner of the county in which they 
reside, and are required 

(1.) To be, if males, not less than 17, and if females, not less 
than 16, years of age, 

(2.) To produce a certificate of good moral character, signed 
by some responsible person. 

(3.) To sign a declaration of their intention to devote them- 
selves to school-teaching in this State, in form as follows : 

' ; I hereby declare my intention to become a teacher in the schools of this State ; 
and agree that for three years after leaving the University I will report in Writing to 
the Principal thereof, in June and December of each year, where I have been and in 
what employed." 

(4. ) To pass a satisfactory examination, before the proper officers 
(County School Commissioners), in Reading, Spelling, Writing, 
Arithmetic, Geography, and the elements of English Grammar. 

EXTRACT FROM THE NORMAL UNIVERSITY ACT. 

Sec. 7. Bach County within the State shall be entitled to gratuitous instruction 
for one pupil in said Normal University, and each Representative District shall be 
entitled to gratuitous instruction for a number of pupils equal to the number of rep- 
resentatives in said district, to be chosen in the following manner : The School Com- 
missioner in each county shall receive and register the names of nil applicants for 
admission to said Normal University, and shall present the same to the County Court, 
or, in counties acting under township organisation, to the Board of Supervisors; which 
said County Court or Board of Supervisors, as the case may be, shall, together with 
the School Commissioner, examine all applicants so presented, in such manner as the 
Board of Education may direct, and from the number of such as shall be found to pos- 
sess the requisite qualifications such pupils shall be selected by lot: and in represen- 
tative districts composed of more thanone county, the School Commissioner and Coun- 
ty Judge, or the School * ommissioner and Chairman of the Board of Supervisors in 
counties acting under township organization, as the rase maj be, of the several coun- 
ties composing such representative district, shall meel ai the Clerk's office of the 
County Court of (he oldest county, and from the applicants bo presented to the Coun- 
ty Court or Board of Supervisors of the several counties represented, and found to 
possess the requisite qualifications, shall select by lol the number of pupils to which 
said district is entitled. The Board of Education shall have discretionary power, if 
any candidate does nol sign and file with the Secretary of the Board a declaration 
that he or she will teach in the public schools within this State, in case thai engage- 
ment can he secured by reasonable efforts, to require such candidate to provide for the 
payment of such i\-r< for tuition a i the Board may prescribe. 
(AMENDED FEBRUARY, 1861.) 

Sec. 4. Bach County in this stale shall hereafter be entitled to gratuitous instruc- 
tion for two pupils in said University, t<> be selected as provided in Section Seven of 
the Act to which (his is an amendment. 

The following was adopted )>v the Board of Education, Decem- 
ber ISth, 1SC.1 : 

Resolved, That tin Principal may, at his discretion, admit to the Normal Univer- 
sity more than two students from each county, provided the whole number of stu- 
dents shall nol exceed the aggregate of two from each county, and one from each rep- 
resentative district. 

The most favorable time for the admission of students is at the 

beginning of the Fall Term; 

Students are expected to be present on the first day of each term. 



OBJECTS, AND OTHER MATTERS. 

The objects to be attained by the Normal School are stated in 
the fourth section of the charter of incorporation. 

Sec. 4. The object of the said Normal University shall be to qualify teachers for 
the common schools of this State, by imparting instruction in the art of teaching, in 
all branches of study which pertain to a common-school education, in the elements of 
the natural sciences— including agricultural chemistry, animal and vegetable physi- 
ology, — in the fundamental laws of the United States and of the State of Illinois, in 
regard to the rights and duties of citizens, and in such other studies as the Board of 
Education may from time to time prescribe. 

Thorough discipline will be enforced in every department of 
the University. 

Experience has shown it to be very necessary that a perfect un- 
derstanding should subsist between the Principal and those with 
whom the students board, in respect to the habits and conduct of 
students at their rooms. This will accordingly be more carefully 
attended to in future. 

Physical exercises will be had daily in all the departments, in- 
cluding military drill under Capt. Potter, who has been a year in 
actual service. 



Board can be obtained in good families for $2.00 a week, ex- 
clusive of fuel, lights and washing: when these are furnished. 
except washing, the usual charge is $2.50 a week. 



The expense of board is reduced about one half, by boarding in 
clubs, and by self-boarding. 

The following may be considered a near approximation to the 
necessary Expenses for one year, exclusive of pocket-money, ap- 
parel, traveling, and board in vacations. 

Board, 40 weeks, from $40.00 to $100.00 

Books and Stationery, ; - 10.00 " 15.00 

Washing. - - - - « 12.00 « 18.00 



Total, 862.00 $133.00 

Tuition is free. 



STATE NORMAL UNIVERSITY. 



23 



Text-Books are furnished free for use in the school-rooms ; but 
students are expected to furnish their own books for use at home, 
so that the books belonging to the University may not be removed 
from the building. 

Students are advised to bring with them such books as they 
may have, but not to purchase others until they arrive at the Uni- 
versity. 

The Apparatus is excellent in quality, and sufficiently ample 
for ordinary purposes of illustration. 



The Diploma of the University is conferred upon all those who 
creditably complete its full course of study and practice. 



There are two Literary Societies, the Philadelphian and the 
Wrightonian, each of which has a Well-selected library. 

The Museum and Library of the Illinois Natural History So- 
ciety are located in the University building, to which the students 
of the University will have access, under suitable restrictions. 



Suggested Form of Certificate. 

I hereby certify that I am well acquainted with , and know him (oi 

her) to be a person of good moral character. 

In case the School Commissioner is not able to make the above 
certificate himself, something like the following indorsement 

should be appended by the School Commissioner : 

r am acquainted with , who signs the above certificate, and believe him 

to be an entirely reliable man, and so far as 1 know and believe, the above named an 
plicantis a person of good moral character. 



24 



STATE NORMAL UNIVERSITY. 









o 





4-3 



.3 2 






£.2.5 



SO* 



is?! 



,. OS . 

J? 

O c 



#8, #3 

M a 2 fj 
4 3 £ S 



T^ 



2s 



■a ^ a 
•8,2,1*1 



-' E .2 ■ 

- - ' - - 

| bo 7. 

a 

s 






72 TJ 

a £ 
3 ? 



3 3 



£ = 5 



• 2 .,- S * 

- 






i'gsg 



X - 



fills 

s 

9 

- 



a 



3 



3 * 

& \ A 

-_ . — 

• — a, >1 X 



£ £J 



. * — ~ - 
£^g< 

- - 5 _ 

3 e 

■§.» 

5«« 



D = - 

- £ I ~ t> 3 b 



= :=: 

5 ill 



50-^ «o 






- fli 



M 

! 2 



STATE NORMAL UNIVERSITY. 25 



MODEL SCHOOL 



COURSE OF STUDY, ETC. 



The Model Department was established in order that there 
might be a school, exhibiting the best methods of teaching, dis- 
cipline and classification, which the Normal students should visit, 
and in which they should take part as instructors. Every effort 
will be put forth to make this, as far as may be, a perfect school, 
conducted upon the best methods, and showing the most whole- 
some results. 

It is intended that the course of study in its several departments 
shall embrace all that belongs to a thorough education, from the 
elements up to a preparation either for College or for business. 
But as the course is not fully matured, a complete synopsis and 
description cannot be given. For the lower classes, a system of 
Object Lessons has been prepared with the greatest care. The de- 
sign of this is to awaken the perceptive faculties, and to form ;i 
habit of accurate observation. Children thus trained not only 
make more thorough scholars, hut also more practical men and 
women. 

The accompanying plan of study will give a general idea of the 

subjects to he pursued in the higher department, and of the time 

allotted to each. It will he observed that two distinct courses are 

arrange! I for the High School : one to prepare students for College, 
and the other for general business. The two, however, arc made 
to blend whenever practicable. But this plan is to be regarded 
as a thing proposed rather than adopted. It will he followed as 

near as may he. during the coming year, and a full and settled 
Course will in the mean time he adjusted. 

The only requisites for admission are a small tuition fee. and a 
good character. 

Boys and girls from abroad may he confidently entrusted to the 

care of the Principal, Mr. Childs ; and besides tin 4 monthly re- 
port of scholarship and deportment at school, which is to he sent 
to all parents, he will include, if desired, a careful statement of 

each pupil's general deportment, and of the manner of spending 

leisure hours. 

The physical exercises will include military drill. 



26 STATE NORMAL UNIVERSITY. 



CALENDAR FOR 1862-63, 



The School Year of Forty Weeks is divided into Three Terms. 
The First Term begins Monday, September 8th, and contin- 
ues Fifteen Weeks. Semi-annual Meeting of the Board of Edu- 
cation, Wednesday, December 17th. Examination at the close of 
Term. 

Vacation of One Week. 
The Second Term begins Monday, December 29th, and con- 
tinues Thirteen Weeks. 

Vacation of One Week. 

The Third Term begins Monday, April 6th, and continues 
Twelve Weeks. Examination during the last Week of Term. — 
Annual Meeting of the Board of Education, Wednesday, June 
24th. Annual Meeting of the Illinois Natural History Society, 
Wednesday, June 24th. Address before the Literary Societies, 
Thursday Evening, June 25th. Commencement Exercises, Fri- 
day, June 26th. 

Vacation of Ten Weeks. 




H-sin u* i< 



IT.I^I T\ < >T5S 



1862-63. 




1 



m 

I Itf 11! ; 





BLOOMINGTON : 

•R.INTKH AT THE DAILY PANTAGRAPH PRINTING HOUSE 



1863. 





V 



CATALOGUE 



FOR THE 



ACADEMIC YEA.H 



JBnclin« June »6, 1863. 



BLOOMINGTON, ILL.: 

PRINTED AT THE DAILY PANTAGRAPH PRINTING HOUSE. 

1863. 







BOARD OF EDUCATION 



STATE OF ILLINOIS. 



Hon. 8.W. MOULTON, Shelbyville, President. 
Hon. J. P. BROOKS, Springfield, ex off. member and Sec'y. 

PERKINS BASS, Esq., Chicago. 

Hon. NEWTON BATEMAN, Springfield, 

WALTER M. HATCH Esq., Bloomington. 

Hon. WM. H. POWELL, Joliet. 

GEO. P. REX, M. D., Perry. 

J. W. SCHWEPPE, Esq., Alton. 

HENRY WING, M. ])., Chicago. 

WILLIAM H. WELLS, Esq., Chicago. 

SIMEON WRIGHT, Esq., Kinmundy. 

Hon. THOMAS J. PICKETT, Moline. 

J. W. SHEAHAN, Esq., Chicago, 

Hon. WM. II. GREEN, Metropolis. 

CALVIN (10UDY, M. D., Taylorville. 



C. W. HOLDER. Esq., Bloomington, Treasurer. 





^>- 



^ 




FACULTY 



RICHARD EDWARDS, Principal, 

Instructor in Mental Science and Didactics. 

EDWIN C. HEWETT, 

Instructor in Geography and History. 

JOSEPH A. SEWALL, 

Instructor in Natural Science. 

THOMAS METCALF, 

Instructor in Mathematics. 

ALBERT STETSON, 

Instructor in Language. 

MARGARET E. OSBAND, 

Instructress in Grammar ami Drawing. 



MODEL SCHOOL, 

CHARLES F. CHILDS, Principal 

LIVONIA E. KETCHAM, 

Teacher in Primary Department. 






STATE NORMAL UNIVERSITY. 




STUDENTS 



wsuxtml^^jb^. «?iML.mj 



Mary' Augusta Fuller, 
Sarah Jane Frances Gove, 
Abbie Ripley Reynolds, 
Sarah Ann Stevenson, - 

William- Dennis Hall, 
Ebenezer Delo'n Harris, 
John Henry Thompson, 
Seniors, 



Tremont, Tazewell. 
Rutland, Lasalle. 
Griygsville, Pike. 
Polo, Oule. 

Vermilion, Lasalle. 
Lenox, Warren. 
Normal, McLean. 




_p 6 STATE 


NORMAL UNIVERSITY. of 


IMEiJaSILK «3aDJ!BL«SS» 




SECTION 


A. 


Julia A. Ives, 


. - 


Bloomington, [McLean. 


Edith F. Johnson, 


_ 


Mendota, Lasalle. 


Harriet E. Stewart, 


- 


Hennepin, Putnam. 


Edwin F. Bacon, 


. 


Normal, McLean. 


George Colvin, 


- 


Bloomington, McLean. 


Lyman B. Kellogg, 


• 


Mc Henry, Mc Henry. 


Philo A. Marsh, - 


- 


Metamora, Woodford. 




SECTION 


B. 


Clara Baker, 


_ 


Farmington, Fulton. 


Mary J. Brown, 


- 


Barry, Pike. 


Martha E. Burrell, 


- 


Freeporl, Stephenson. 


Harriet E. Dunn, 


- 


Bloomington, McLean. 


Ellen V. English, 


. 


Dale, McLean. 


Anna P. Grennell, 


- 


Normal, McLean. 


Olinda M. Johnson, 


. 


Mendota, Lasalle. 


Isabella Moore, 


- 


Perry, Pike. 


Bandusia Wakefield, 


- 


DeWitt, DeWitt. 


Missouri White, 


- 


Bloomington, McLean . 


Andrew M. McClure, 


- 


Marshall, Clark. 




SECTION 


C. 


Mary J. Bryant, 


- 


Normal, McLean. 


Mary J. Hunter, 


- 


Rock ford, Winnebago. 


Mary Kingman, 


- 


Tremout, Tazewell. 


Martha L. Mercer, 


- 


Princeton, Bureau. 


Margaret McCambridge, 


Normal, ''.McLean. 


Mary E. Pearce, 


. 


Normal, McL 


Susan A. Pike, 


. 


Bloomington, McLean. 


Catherine'Tt. Stine, 


- 


Bloomington, McLean. 


Lydia J. Tilton, 


- 


Bloomington, McLean. 


Thomas J. Burrill, 


- 


Davis, Stephenson. 


Philo A. Clark, 


. 


Decatur, Macon. 


William Florine, 


- 


HigJiland, Madison. 


Joseph Malcom, 


_ 


Salem, Marion. 


Oscar F. McKim, 


- 


Dallas City, Henderson. 


Robert L. Mudd, 


_ 


Terre Haute, Henderson. 


Truman J. Pearce, 


- 


Normal, McLean. 


Johnson W. Straight 


, - 


Fairbury, Livingston. 


Adolph A. Suppiger, 


- 


Highland, Madison. 


Middle Class, 


• 


36. 



o STATE NORMAL UNIVERSITY. 7 q 


JT"Cr3ir3C«>3BB CJGi^SS. 


SECTION 


A. 


Harriet A. Barber, 


Mendota, Lasalle. 


Emma Barnard, - 


Griggsville, Pike. 


Eleanora A. Byington, 


Ridoit, Stephenson. 


Sophia C. Elkins, 


Bloomington, McLean. 


Anna A. Fulwiler, 


Lexington, McLean. 


Isabella F. Gowdy, - 


Monmouth, Warren, 


Armenia C. Jones, 


Canton, Fulton. 


Mary F. Kelsey, 


Mound City, Pulaski. 


Hannah Kenner, - 


Mora, Clay. 


Zadie Ketcham, - 


Minooka, Will. 


Camilla S. Kinney, 


Bloomington, McLean. 


lone Knauer, - 


Bloomington, McLean. 


Clarissa K. Lewis, 


Normal, McLean. 


Mary Little, - . - 


Little Bock, Kane. 


Ella E. Mercer, 


Peoria, Peoria. 


Clara Miller, - 


Flora, Clay. 


Mary A. Norris, - 


Perry, Pike. 


Alice B. Piper, - 


Macomb, McDonough. 


Sarah E. Raymond, 


Lisbon, Kendall. 


Mary A. E. Riorden, 


Aurora, Kane. 


Virginia C Ripley, 


Belleville, St. Clair. 


Elizabeth M. Rowley, 


Bloomington, McLean. 


Lavenia J. Shannon, 


Bloomington, McLean. 


Cornelia Shugert, 


Bloomington, McLean. 


Amanda 0. Sparks, 


Rushville, Schuyler. 


Lucinda J. Stanard, 


Lamoille, Bureau. 


Amelia P. Stockdale. 


Canton, Fulton. 


Eliza Stone, - 


Versailles, Brown. 


Jerusha M. Tower, 


Mendota, Lasalle. 


Helen M. Wadleigh, 


Rutland, Lasalle, 


Alice E. Willis, 


Richview, Washington. 


Mary J. Worthington, 


Metropolis, Massac. 


J. W. Arnold, 


Bloom lug Ion, Mcljcan. 


Irving H. Bakewcll, - 


Normal, McLean. 


Eugene F. Baldwin, 


Carlyle, Clinton. 


Onias C. Barber, ... 


Richview, Washington. 


John W. Cook, 


Kappa, Woodford. 


Charles H. Crandell, 


Magnolia, Put num. 


John Ellis Jr., 


El Paso, Woodford. 


Jacob II. Fishburn, 


El Paso, Woodford. 




STATE NORMAL UNIVERSITY. 




David M. Fuhviler, 
Aquila Janney, 
Jonathan B. Neel, 
Daniel W. Norris, 
"William Pardee, 
Noah H. Pike, 
Richard Porter, 
Thomas M. Salisbury, 
Henry K. Smith, 
Melancthon Wakefield, 



Margaret M. Anthony, 
Alice Barnett, 
Helen B. Bodelson, 
Laura M. Boggs, 
Elizabeth A. Bruner, 
Charlotte Evans, 
Martha Foster, 
Laura J. Fulwiler, 
Harriet A. Fyffe, 
Eurania G. Gorton, 
Mary R. Gorton, 
Sarah S. Gowdy, 
Martha E. Gunn, 
Jane E. Hamill, 
Juliette V. Hardy, 
Mary 1. Ho 
Anna M. Kitchell, 
Eliza J. Minier, 
Lydia A. Pearce, 
Eliza A. Pratt, 
Mary A. Rearden, 
Ellen Z. Roberts, 
Sarah E. Slaughter, 
Mary J. Smith, 
Nancy C. Smith, 
Julia E. Stanard, 
S. Anna Stevens, 
Emma Thrift, - 
Caroline C. Tustin, 
Zilpha Vandercook, 
Frances B. Woodbury, 



Lexington, McLean. 
Prairie City, McDonougk. 
Macomb, McDonough. 
Quincy, Adams. 
Carlyle, Clinton. 
Bloomington, McLean. 
Decatur, Macon. 
Tolono, Champaign. 
Magnolia, Putnam. 
DeWitt, DeWitt. 



SECTION B 



Princeton, Bureau. 
LeRoy, McLean. 
Rock Island, Rock Island. 
Mackinaw, Tazewell. 
Metropolis, Massac. 
Taylo rville; CIi r islian . 
Douglas, Knox. 

.'on, McLean. ■ 
Normal, McLean. 
Rock Island, Rock L 
Rock Island. Rude Island. 
Monmouth, War 
Richview, Wash ingtou. 
Lexington, McL 
Joliet, Will. 
Belleville, St. Clair. 
Bloomington, McLean. 
Mackinaw, Tazewell. 
Mendota, Lasal . 
Oneida, Knox. 
Shawneetown, Gallatin. 
Winchester, Scott. 
Chicago, Cook. 
Clinton, DeWitt. 
Wat ago, Knox. 
Lamoille, Bureau. 
Joliet, Will. 
Metropolis, Massac. 
Maiden, Bureau. 
Rockford, Winnebago. 
Morris, Grundy. 






•^ 



STATE NORMAL UNIVERSITY. 




James B. Beadles, 

James W. Cox, - 

John H. Crandall, 

John A. Davis, - 

Henry B. Funk, - 

Charles Hayes, - - 

William G. Hill, 

DeWitt C. Hoyt, 

Francis M. Jordan, 

Jehu Kenner, - 

Thomas N. Lakin, 

Charles Lindly. - 

George Marsh, 

William H. McKmney. 

George W. Nash, - 

SECTION 
Lucinda A. Annis, 
Caroline A. Bacon, - 
Lizzie Barker, - 

Sarah D. Barker, 
Sarah E. Blanchard, 
Mary E. Bondurant, 
Susan L. Briggs, - 
Vashti J. Brittin, - 

Jane E. Brown, 
Mary M. Bruner, 
S. Elizabeth Caldwell, - 
Marion C. Canfield, 
Harriot M. Case, 
Florence J. Crcaxey, - 
Louisa E. Davis, - 
Sarah C. Gibson - 

Elizabeth S. Guilford, 
Amelia A. Hardy, 
Sarah A. Ilebberd, 
Margarett Hughes, 
Sarah M. Jameson, 
Mary G. Langston, 
Lucetta M. Lawson, 
Eli/.a Le Barron, ... 

Euretta A. Lewis, 
Isabel Merriman, 
Florence Montgomery, 



Winchester, Scott. 
Kappa, Woodford, 
Morton, Tazewell. 
Petersburg, Menard. 
Lynnville, Morgan. 
diicago, Cook. 
Rushville, Schuyler. 
Springfield, Sangamon. 
Decatur, Macon. 
Flora, Clay, 
Bosemond, Christian. 
Springfield, Sangamon. 
Metamora, Woodford. 
Carlinv 'die. Macoupin. 
Nilwood, Macoupin. 
C. 

Peoria, Peoria. 
Normal, McLean. 
Bloomington, McLean. 
Bloomington, McLean. 
Lascdle. 
Monticello, Piatt. 
Mackina w, Taze well. 
LeRoy, McLean. 
Hillsboro, Montg >m< ry. 
Edging! on, Rock Island. 
Farmington, Fulton, 
Batavia, Kane. 
Karlcille, 

ML Vernon, Jefferson. 
Bloomington, McLean. 

Lasalle. 
SI i elby v tile, She I by . 
Joliet, Will. 
Joliet, Will. 
Bloomington, McLean. 
Edgington, Rock Island. 
Median icsbu . y, Sangamon. 
Chest \facoupin. 

J j loom ington, McLean . 

>, Peoria. 
Farmington, Fulton. 






10 



STATE NOMAL UNIVERSITY. 




Ellen A. Parsons, 
Mary C. Patterson, 
Abigail A. Pearce. 
Harriet EL Perry, 
Rebecca A. Richardson, 
Fannie E. Robinson, 
Josie J. Robinson, 
Sarah D. Roseborough, 
Mary P. Scriven, 
Manila E. Tilton, 
Ella E. Walker, 



Magnolia, Putnam. 
Bloomington, McLean. 
Mendota, Lasalle. 
Bloomington, McLean. 
Taylorville, Christian. 
Peoria, Peoria. 
Fairfield, Wayne. 
Cottonwood Grove, Bond. 
Groveland, Tazewell. 
Bloomington, McLean. 
Springfield, Sangamon. 



John C. Boggs, 
David Brubaker, 
Varnel J. Buchanan, 
William P. Carter, 
Roger T. Clover, 
Spencer S. Cone, 
Henry C. Cox. 
Joseph H. Hills, 
William T. Jones, 
Christopher Krebs, 
Joseph P. Maxey, 
Marcus W. Messinger, 
George P. Messinger, 
Leonidas Minier, 
Thornton Montgomery, 
Ephraim F. Moulton, 
*Isaac M. Pearson, 
John H. Rhomack, 
f James P. Rice, 
Gerhardt Schick, 
Thomas J. Scholes, 
Clark Smith, 
William C. Smith, 
John H. Stone, 
Preston M. Sutton, 
John J. Taylor, 
George W. Toms, 
William Wylde, 
Junior Class, 



Mackinaiv, Tazewell. 
Freeport, Stephenson. 
Laivrenceville, Lawrence. 
McL,eansborough,Hamilon. 
Springfield, Sangaman. 
Farmington, Fulton. 
Fayette, Green. 
Winchester, Scott. 
Clearcreed, Carroll. 
Highland, Madison. 
Shoal Creek, Clinton. 
Morton, Tazewell. 
Morion, Tazewell. 
Mackinaw, Tazewell. 
Pekin, Tazewell. 
Pavilion, Kendall. 
Bloomington, McLean. 
Normal, McLean. 
Havana, Mason. 
Mt. Pulaski, Logan. 
Chilicothe, Peoria. 
Majority Pt., Cumberland. 
Marion, Johnson. 
Kappa, Woodford. 
Richmond, McHenry. 
Grand Rapids, Lasalle. 
Bloomington, McLean. 

162. 



*Expelled. 
fDeceased. 






PUPILS OF THE MODEL SCHOOL. 



Grammar and High School Departments. 



^ZEZHMCA-ItJES- 



Alexander, Marian L. 
Arnold, Sarah, 
Bakewell, Selina, 
Bosworth, Etnma, 
Bryant, Anna, C, 
Bryant, Dorothea J., 
Bryant, Josephine H., 
Bishop, Chloe E., 
Crist, Emma M., 
Childs, Lue M., 
Clark, Kachel, 
Case, Gertrude, 
Case, Hannah, 
Case, Sevilla, 
Clayton, Margaret, 
Coleman, Laura E.„ 
Davidge, Cornelia, 
Edwards, Annie M., 
Evans, Clara E., 
Fyffe, Beatrice, 
Fell, Eliza B., 
Fell, Clara V., 
Fell, Mary A., 
Greene, Laura E., 
Hatch, Abbie A., 
Hobson, Adela, 
Holmes, MaryF., 
Joder, Mary, 
Joaes, Flora V., 
Kelsey,! Marl ha., 
Lee, Mary M., 
Lewis, Harriet, 
Messer, Mary J., 
Mitchell, Emma, 



Bloomington. 
Blooming Grove. 
Normal. 
Bloomington. 
Normal. 
Normal. 
Normal. 
Bloomington. 
Bloomington. 
Findlay, Ohio. 
Albion. 
Normal. 
Normal. 
Normal. 
Hardin. 
Bloomington. 
Caledonia. 
Normal. 
Normal. 
Normal. 
Normal. 
Normal. 
Normal. 
Naperville. 
Griggsville 
Naperville. 
Normal. 
Danvers. 
Bloomington. 
Mound City, 
mington. 
Bloomington. 
Normal. 
Bloomington. 




lp 12 STATE 


NORMAL UNIVERSITY. 


% 


Matthews, Mary E., 


♦ 
Bloomington. 




Pearce, Anna M,, 


- ' - - - Mendota. 




Philbrook, Laura A. 


F., - - - Bloomington. 




Pike, Linnie, 


- Bloomington. 




Pike, Annie, 


Bloomington. 




Keeder, Mary A., 


- Normal. 




Koney, Winniefred, 


Normal. 




Stewart, Mary E., 


- Normal. 




Stewart, Elenor, 


Bloomington. 




Sibert, Loretta B., 


- Normal. 




Sprague, Jane E., 


Normal. 




Smith, Martha, 


- Clinton. 




Thompson, Margaret A., - - Blooming/ton. 




Vandcvender, Sophronia, - - - Bloomington. 




Van Horn, Samantha, Magnolia. 




Wright, Sallie A., 


- Normal. 




White, Mary, 


Bloomington. 




Younger, Mary M., 


- Magnolia. 

:»jca.:kj"jess. 




Allen, Jas. M., 


Grafton. 




Allen, Ford, 


- Blo<n 




Bishop, Luther, 


Bloomington. 




Benton, Geo. S., 


- Normal. 




Bake well, Chas. E., 


Normal. 




Bosworth, Leonard, 


- Blooming! on. 




Baily, Cyrus M., 


Delavan. 




Brown, Marshall, 


- Delavan. 




Cullum, Wm. J., 


Ponti'" . 




Crist, Howard, 


- Bloomington. 




Coe, J. Everett, 


Bloomington. 




Cassal, B. Hilton, 


Decatur. 




Cook, Frank E., 


- • St. Louis. 




Campbell, Thaddeus, 


- Normal. 




Dietrich, John G., 


Bloomington. 




Davison, Joseph T., 


- | Bloomington. 




Davison, Edgar A., 


Bloomington. 




Dunn, J. Edward, 


- Normal. 




Dunn, John, 


-' - - - St. Louis. 




Dillon, Arthur, 


- McLean. 




Dent, Orlando, 


Magnolia. 




Edwards, Richard Ai 


•thur, - Normal. 




Evans, John D., 


Normal. 




Evans, Eli T., 


- Normal. 






STATE NORMAL UNIVERSITY. 



13 




Eddy, Win., -. - - - - Bloomington^ 

Ewing, Adlai T., Bloomingion. 

Elder, Jas. C, - - - - Hey worth. 

Fenton, Hamilton W., - Decatur. 

Fell, I. Price, - Bloomingion. 

Foss, Sam. M., - - ' - - - Bloomingion. 

Fisk, Chas. H., - - - - Bloomingion. 

Fell, J. Comley, - - - - - Normal. 

Gault, Isaac B., - - - - Monticello. 

Gillett, Jas. L., - - - - - Bloomingion. 

Hatch, Mason, - Griggsville. 

Howard, Hosea, - - - - - Bloomingion. 

Howard, Chas., - Bloomingion. 

Henny, David F., - Bloomingion. 

Holmes, Chas. B., - - - - Normal. 

Horn, David J., - - - - Woodford. 

Hough, Jas. F., - - - - Bloomingion. 

Hogue, Wm., Shirley. 

Horr, DeWitt, - - - - Cheney's Grove. 

Hord, Calmes, Bloomingion. 

Ingals, Chas. H., - - - - Sublette. 

Ingals, E. Fletcher, - Sublette. 

Johns, W. Corwin, - - - Decatur. 

Karr, Aaron, - Hey worth. 

Lowe, Vincent, - - . - - Bloomingion. 

Law, Albert, Henry. 

Minor, Thos. S., - Normal. 

McCambridge, Wm., - Norvial. 

McCart, Robt., - - - - Bloomingion. 

McGrew, Chas. M., - Normal. 

McGrew, Militus, - Normal. 

McGrew, Erastus, - Normal. 

Moore, Arthur, .... Clinton. 

Matthews, Win. F., - - - - Bloomingion. 

Montross, Oliver W., - - - Ccniralia. 

Marble, Wm., ... . Bloomington. 

Newell, Edgar L., .... Bloomington. 

Niccolls, Cassius, .... Bloomingion. 

Price, Edgar L., - - - - Bloomington. 

Pearcc Jas. G., Normal. 

Perry, Jno. D., .... Bloomington. 

Phoenix, Sain., - Normal. 

Poston, Edwin !>., - ♦ - - - No, 





14 



STATE NORMAL UNIVERSITY. 




AP> 



Pardee, Luther, 
Parke, Chas. W., 
Bowleg, S. Thomas, 
Rawson, Wm,, 
Rearden, Frank S., 
Reynolds, Jno. P., 
Reed, Starling, 
Roe, Edward T., 
Sprague, Chas. E,, 
Soule, Chas. F., 
Soule, S. Howard, 
Seybold, Frederick J., 
Stevenson, Rich. F., 
Starnate, Milton F., 
Stevens, Jas. D., 
Shough, Jas. R., 
Schnebley, Henry L., 
Thayer, Joseph, 
Taylor, Addison C, 
Taylor, Jas. B., 
Thayer, H. Milton., 
Toms, Gilbert V., 
Thompson, J. Hurd, 
Tucker, Frank W., 
Tucker, F. Trueman, 
Tucker, Jas. C, 
Woods, Jno. II., 
Ward, Jno. M., 



- Bloomington. 
Bloomington. 

- Bloomington. 
St. Louis. 

- Bloomington. 
Griggsville. 

- Minooka. 
Bloomington. 

- Normal. 
Alton. 
Vllin. 
LasalU. 

- Polo. 
Magnolia. 

- Joliet. 
Bloomington. 

- Peoria. 
Chatham. 

- Nor) ual. 
Nicholasville, Kg. 

- Minooka. 
Bloomington. 

- Bloomington. 
Kappa. 

- El Paso. 
El Paso. 

- Normal. 
Bloomington. 



Primary and Intermediate Departments. 

Alexander, Annie, - Bloomington. 

Bacon, Katie, ----- Normal. 

Bakewell, Lutie, ----- Normal. 

Case, Florence, - Normal. 

Ceigler, Rachel, Normal. 

Edwards, Nellie, - - - Normal. 

Edwards, Mary, - Normal. 

Fell, Alice, ----- Normal. 

Fell, Rachael, - Normal. 

Gallup, Sarah J., Normal. 

Holmes, Clara, - Normal. 

Holmes, Nellie, - - - * - Normal. 



3d- 



jtP 




STATE NORMAL UNIVERSITY. 



15 



Vi 



Hughes, Sallie, '-.--,- Pulaski Co. 

Hammond, Sarah, - - - - Normal. 

Hammond, Lizzie, - - Normal. 

Moore, Hannah, - ' ■- - - Normal. 

Moore, Mary, Normal. 

Major, Betsy, - Normal. 

North, Emma, - - - - , - Normal. 

Nolle, Mary, - Normal. 

Phoenix, Flora Mary, - - - Normal. 

Parke, Katie, - - - - Bloomington. 

Eeeder, Sarah, Normal. 

Reeder, Susan, - Normal. 

Rowley, Fanny, ----- Bloomington. 

Sprague, Fanny, - Normal. 

Sherman, Carrie, - Normal. 

Sibert, Sarah, Normal. 

Scarbrough, Lucy, - Normal. 

Therman, Mandana, - Normal. 

Yapp, Emma, - - - - Bloomington. 

Allen, Sewall. - Bloomington. 

Bryant, Thomas, - Normal. 

Colman, Myron, - - - Normal. 

Dodge, Willie, Normal. 

Dodge, John, - Normal. 

Fulwiler, James, - Lexington. 

Gallup, Cha , - Normal. 

Gallup, Frank, Normal. 

Gowdy, Charles, - Bloomington. 

Holmes, Frank, - Normal. 

Hictt, Edward, - Normal. 

Hiett, Thomas, Normal. 

Hiett, Lafayette, - Normal. 

Kitchell, Albert, - Bloomington. 

Landagan, James, - Normal. 

Landagan ; Edward, - Normal. 

Lee, John, Bloomington. 

Miller, Harry, Bloomington. 

McGrew, Jasper, - Normal. 

McCarthy, Edwin - Normal. 

Moore, John, Normal. 

Moore, Charles, Normal. 

Malcy, John, - - - - - - Normal. 





16 



STATE NORMAL UNIVERSITY. 




O'Brian, Morris, - - . - - Bloomington. 

Phoenix, Melville, - Normal. 

Phoenix, Fred, - - - - - Normal. 

Pardee, Frank, Bloomington. 

Pierse, Walter, - Bloomington. 

Park, James, Bloomington. 

Park, Robert, Bloomington. 

Phillips, Osceola, - Normal. 

Reeder, David, - Normal. 

Reeves, Edward, Normal. 

Smith, Jacob, Bloomington. 

Smith, David, - - - - - Bloomington. 

Stine, Perry, Bloomington. 

Sill, James, - - - - - - McLean Co. 

Stockton, Frank, - Bloomington. 

Sprague, Ezra, ----- Normal. 

Sprague, Willie, - Normal. 

Stone, Waldo, Hamburg. 

Sibert, Andrew, .... Normal. 

Shough, Willie, Bloomington. 

Willard, John, - Bloomington. 

Williams, Marshall, - Bloomington. 

Williams, John, - Bloomington. 

Woodbury, Lewis, - Morris. 

Wright, Elisha, - Normal. 



m «T3MEMC-A.aE«,3ir. 



Ladies. Gentlemen. Whole No. 



Senior Class, 


. 4 


3 


7 


Middle Class, 


22 


14 


36 


Junior Class, 


- 101 


61 


162 


Total, - 


- 127 
MODEL SCHOOL. 


78 


205 



HIGHER DEPARTMENT. 

Females, 52 ; Males, 95 ; Whole No., 147. 

PRIMARY DEPARTMENT. 

Females, 31 ; Males, 48 ; Whole No., 79. 
Total 



Grand Total, 




226 
431 



f^ 




STATE NORMAL UNIVERSITY. 



17 




COURSE OF STUDY. 

TABULAR VIEW. 


1st Year. 


2d Year. 


3d Year. 




1 | 2 | 3 


4 | 5 | 6 


7 | 8 | 9 


Terms. 




6 

CO 

.-: 


6 


6 

U3 


6 


6 


d 

X} 


d 


d 


15 
51 
13 


I 
II 

III 

IV 

V 

VI 

VII 

o 

S" 
c 
gs 










* 










* 


Hist, and Methods of Educ. 
Constitutes of U. S. and 111. 
School Laws of Illinois 






* 








* 




* 
















* 




















* 


12 
93 
28 
12 
28 
15 
12 
40 
28 
13 
13 
12 
IS 
12 
28 
28 
80 
15 
25 


* 


* 


* 


* 


* 


* 




* 








* | * 






















* 






















* J * | 










"ff 


•1 












| 


* 




* 


* 






# 


"T" 






1 1 


TT" 










| | 




* 




Chemistry 


| 




IT 


T" 




Botany 


1 1 


1 


Physiology.. 


| | 


. | 




Zoology 














* 




* | * 


* 


* 


* 


* 


* 




; 




* 


* 


* 


* 


* 


* 


* 




* 




* 


• | * 




* 








1 1 

1 











































COURSE OF STUDY. 



The Divisions I, II, III, etc., in the foregoing Table, are made 
with reference rather to the studies in charge of different teachers 
than to a strictly logical grouping of subjects : The annexed syl- 
labus is intended as a Key to the table. 




Metaphysics.— Fourth Term. — Mental Philosophy precedes and is made the basis 
of instruction in the Theory and Art of Teaching. It comprises : (1.) An explication 
of terms. (2.) A general inquiry into the natu re of mind : What is it ? What are its 
Facts, Laws, and Results ? The facts and laws of Knowledge, Feeling, and Exertion ? 
(3.) A more particular study of consciousness, Perception, Memory. Imagination, and 
the Reflective and Regulative Powers. (4.) The Feeling. Theory of Pleasure and 
Pain. 

Theory and Art of Teaching.— The Third. Sixth. Seventh and Ninth Terms are 
occupied, in this department, with the study of the Science. Methods and History of 
Education. The course of necessity take- a BOmev hat wide range, so that only a part 
of the topics can here be enumerated. (1.) The Order, in time, of the Development 
of the Mental Faculties, and the exercises best adapted to encourage their growth. 
The special purpose of each faculty, ami the means to train it. Relation of the Mind 
to the Body, and the effect of the vigorous exercise of each upon the other. Laws of 
Bodily Health. Ventilation; Posture: Gymnastics ; Format ion of Courses of Study. 
(2.) Motives. The incentives which a teacher may allow to act upon himself or his 
pupils. The Conscience— how it should be educated. (3.) The Organization and 
Classification of Schools. Programme of Daily Exercises. The Recitation. School 
Government. (4.) History of Systems and Methods of Education. Biographies of 
Eminent Teachers. (5.) Drill Exercises in Teaching. Observation and Practice in 
the Model School. General Teaching Exercises before the Normal School. 

Eighth Term. — The Constitutions of the United States and of the State of Illinois. 
Duties of Teachers as Citizens. 

Ninth Term. — The School Laws of Illinois. School Supervision and Management. 
School-House Architecture. Practice in the Model School. General Exercise3 in the 
Normal School. 



Reading. — First Term. — Analysis of Words according to their elementary sounds. 
Articulation and Pronunciation. Compass and Flexibility of Voice. Analysis of 
Words according to their derivation and formation. 




STATE NORMAL UNIVERSITY. 19 oJV 



Grammar. — Second Term,. — Etymology during the first half of the term. Aim to 
teach the office of each part of speech in the construction of sentences. Critical Pars- 
ing. During the last half of the term, Construct, Analyze, and Parse sentences of 
various kinds. Daily exercise throughout the term in the Correction of false Syntax. 

Third Term. — Analysis and Construction of Sentences continued. Rules of Syntax. 
Capitalization. Consideration of Abridged Propositions and Idiomatic Forms and 
Constructions. Daily exercise in the Correction of False Syntax. 

Rhetoric; — Fourth Term. — Formation of the English Language, Literary Taste. 
Figurative Language. Style and its varieties. Punctuation. Composition, Analysis 
and Amplification of Subjects. 

Reading. — Fifth Term. — Modulation. Prosody. Composition read once a week 
during the term. 

I iterar'y Criticism. — Sixth Term. — Examine the style of the best English Authors 
of different periods. Study particularly the style of Milton, Addison, Goldsmith, etc. 
Blair's Rhetoric. Compositions during the term. 

Eighth Term. — History of English Literature. Rise and Development in England 
and America, of Poetry, History, Romance, the Essay, Oratory, and Metaphysics. 
Principal Authors in each department. Newspapers, Reviews, and Magazines. Eng- 
lish Literature compared with that of other nations. Orations and Essays written 
weekly, and delivered or read in the presence of the students. 



:h>:h:"w~;m:®;®:«s>:iw s:ja:jaL„ 

Arithmetic. — First Term. — The Decimal System: including Decimal Fractions, so 
called. Factoring, and its application to Common Multiples and Divisors. Fractions. 
Compound Numbers. 

Second Term. — Ratio and Proportion. Percentage 3 with its application to Loss and 
Sain, Commission, Insurance, etc. Percentage with time, including Interest, Dis- 
count, Partnership, and Equationof Payments. Exchange, (Inland and Foreign). 
Etracxtion of Second and Third Roots of Numbi rs. Arabic method of Notation, using 
bases other than D) ; applied particularly to Duodecimals. 

Algebra. — Third Term. — Algebraic Notation, Factoring, with application to Di- 
visors ami Multiples. Fractions. Equations of First Degree. Extraction of the 
Roots of Algebrak quantities. Rules deduced for the extraction of the Boots of Num- 
bers. Radicals. 
Fourth Term (Optional). — Equations of Second Degree. Ratio and Proportion. 
: including i he Progression, Binomial Expansion, Permutation, Undetermined 
Coefficients, Methods of Interpolation, and the methods of Summing Special Forms; 
Piling of Balls and Sh ;arithms, with Methods of Computing the Tables, Ex- 

ponential Equations, with position. Interest and An i 

Geometry — Fourth Term. — Straight Line, and Surfaces bounded bystraight Lines. 
The Circle. Extra Theorems and Problems given for demonstration and solution. 

Fifth Perm.— 4Bolids bounded by Planes. The Cylinder. The Cone. Surfai 
Solidil Plane Trigonometry, with its application to band Surveying, 

elin a of Magnetic Needle. 

Eighth and Ninth Terms (Optional). — Equationof Point Flight Lines and Circle. 
I Point, Right Lines, and Plane, in Sphere. Equations of Cylinder and 
General Equation of Conic Section referred to its own Plane. General Equa- 
tion ot i ee between two Variables. Loci. Surface of Revolution. Dif- 
ilu i. [ntegral Calculus. 

/ Verm. — Laws of Motion and Mechanics. Hydrostatics and Hy- 
draulics. Pneumatics, optic:;. Electricity and Magnetism. 





;s©:m:"w~:m:@:m:c»iw :mi"W. 

Gesgraphy.— First Term. — (1.) General Principles of Geography : Execution of 
Maps, and Outline of South America, 15 lessons ; Andes Mountains and countries 
containing them, 13 lessons; remaining countries of South America, 5 lessons; 
Cities of South America, 5 lessons ; Review, 5 lessons. Total for South America, 43 
lessons. (2.) Outline and Map of North America, 5 lessons; Russian and British 
America, 5 lessons ; New England and New York, 12 lessons. Astronomical Geogra- 
phy, Latitude and Longitude, Day and Night, the Seasons, etc., 5 lessons. Review, 
5 lessons. 

Second Term. — (1.) Remaining States and Territories of the United States, 22 les- 
sons ; Mexico, Central America, etc., 5 lessons ; Revi ew, 3 lessons. Total for North 
America, 52 lessons. (2.) Outline and Map of Europe, 5 lessons ; Mountains and Riv- 
ers of the Continent, 5 lessons ; Rapid glance at the counties of the Continent, 10 les- 
sons ; More thorough study of Britain as a model, 10 lessons: Review, 5 lessons. 
Total for Europe, 35 lessons. 

Sixth Term. — (1.) Outline and Map of Asia, 5 lessons: Mountains and Rivers of 
Asia, 5 lessons ; Countries and Cities, 10 lessons ; Total for Asia, 20 lessons. (2.) Phy- 
sical Geography. Review of the Earth's Form, with a sketch of the Theory of its 
Origin, 10 lessons ; Physical Life of the Earth. Temperature, Atmospheric and Marine 
Currents ; Rains, and the Effects of Climatic Conditions on Vegetable and Animal 
Life, 12 lessons. Historical View of the Earth: the Relations of its Forms and Phys- 
ical Life to the Development of the Human Race, 8 lessons ; Review, 10 lessons. To- 
tal for Physical Geography. 40 lessons. 

United States History. — Fourth Term. — Voyages. Discoveries, and Indian Tribes, 
10 lessons; Colonial History. 15 lessons; French War and Revolution. 20 lessom; 
Subsequent History, with a special study of Illinois, 15 lessons; Review. 15 lessons. 
Text-Book— Willson. 

Ancient History.— Fifth Term.— One Term ("IS weeks)', 65 Lessons. Early Asiatic 
Nations, 7 lessons: Grecian History, 12 lessons; Roman History, 15 lessons: 
Prominent Events of the Middle Ages, 10 lessons; Britons, 5 lessons; Review. 15 les- 
sons. Text-Book — Weber. 

Asxeostomy — Eighth Term. — Definitions, with Oral Lessons and Exercises, 5 les- 
sons ; Constellations, with Maps of the Heavens, 15 lessons: Refraction, Parallax. 
Time, the Seasons. Motions, Distances and Orbits of Planer.-. 15 lessons; General De- 
scription of the Solar System. 14 lessons : Eclipses and Tide-. 5 lessons : Review, 10 
lessons. Total, 65 lessons. Text-Books— Robinson's and Bnrritt's. 



Chemistry.— Fifth Term.— Names and Properties of Elements : Symbols: Formu- 
las; Chemical Affinity, etc. Laws of Definite Proportions. Behavior of Chemical 
Bodies toward each other. Changes of Form, Color, Properties. Air, Water, Light, 
their relations to organic life. Organic Chemistry. Food of Plants. Outline of 
Chemical Analysis, qualitative and quantitative. Philosophy of Chemistry. 

Botany. — Sixth Term.— Structure of Plants. Mode of Growth, etc. Their relations 
to each other. Classification. Systems of Analysis. Natural and Linnsean. Written 
Analysis of at least seventy-five species of native plants by the Natural system. 

Anatomy and Physiology. — Seventh Term. — General Tiew of the Structure and 
Functions of the Human Body. Food and the Digestive Process. The Blood : its 
Chemical Composition and Vital Properties. Respiration and Nutrition. The Nerv- 
ous System. The Laws of Hygiene. 

Zoology. — Ninth Term. — The Sphere and Fundamental Principles of Zoology.— 
General Properties of Organized Bodies. Functions and Organs of Animal Life. In- 
telligence and Instinct. Metamorphoses of Animals. Geographical Distribution of 
Animals. 





ADMISSION. 

Students seeking admission to the University should make ap- 
plication to the School Commissioner of the county in which they 
reside, and are required — 

(1.) To be, if males, not less than 17, and if females, not less 
than 16, years of age. 

(2.) To produce a certificate of good moral character, signed 
by some responsible person, 

(3.) To sign a declaration of their intention to devote them- 
selves to school-teaching in this State, in form as follows : 

'• I hereby declare my intention to become a teacher in the schools of this State ; 
and agree tbat for three years after leaving the University I will report in writing to 
the Principal thereof, in June aud December of each year, where I have been and in 
what employment. 

(4,) To pass a satisfactory examination, before the proper officers 
(-County School Commissioners), in Reading, Spelling, Writing, 
Arithmetic, Geography, and the elements of English Grammar. 

EXTRACT F^OM THE NORMAL UNIVERSITY ACT. 

. Sec. 7.--Each County withia the State shall be entitled to gratuitous instruction 
for one pupil in said Normal University, and each Representative District shall be 
entitled to gratuitous instruction for a number of pupils equal to the number of rep- 
resentatives in said district, to be chosen in tbc following manner : The School Com- 
missioner in'each county shall receive and register the names of all applicants for 
admission to said Normal' University, and shall present the same to the County Court, 
or, in counties acting under township organization, to the Board of Supervisors, which 
said County Court or Board of Supervisors, as the case may he, shall, together with 
the School Commissioner, examine all applicants so presented, in such manner as the 
Board of Education may direct, and from the number of such as shall be found to pos- 
sess the requisite qualifications, such pupils shall be selected by lot : and in represen- 
tative districts, composed of more than one county, the School Commissioner and 
County Judge, or the School Commissioner and Chairman of the Board of Supervisors 
in counties acting under township organization, as the case may be, of the several 
counties composing such representative district, shall meet at the Clerk's office of the 
County Court of the oldest county, and from the applicants so presented to the Coun- 
ty Court or Board of Supervisors of the several counties represented, and found to 
possess the requisite qualifications, shall select by lot the number of pupils to which 
said district is entitled. The Board of Education shall have discretionary power, if 
any candidate does not sign and iile with the Becretary of the Board a declaration 
thai he or she will teach in the public schools within this State, in case that engage- 
ment can be secured by reasonable efforts, to require such candidate to provide lor 
the payment of such fees for tuition as the Board may prescribe. 

(AMENDED FEBRUARY, 1S61.) 

Sec. 4.— Each County in this State shall, hereafter, be entitled to gratuitous in- 
struction for two pupils in said University, to Deselected as provided in Section Seven 
oi fche Act to which this is an an amendment. 

The following was adopted by the Board of Education, Decem- 
ber 18th, 1861. 

Resolved, That the Principal may, at his discretion, admit to the Normal Univer- 
sity more than 1 wo students from each county, provided the whole number of stu- 
dents shall not exceed (he aggregate of two from each county, and one from each rep- 
resentative district. 

The most favorable time for the admission of students is at the 
beginning of the Fall Term. 
Students are expected to be present on the first day of each term. 





22 STATE NORMAL UNIVERSITY. 




-ft 



OBJECTS, AND OTHER MATTERS. 

The objects to be attained by the Normal School are stated in 
the Fourth Section of the Charter of Incorporation. 

Sec. 4— The object of the said Normal University shall be to qualify teachers for 
the common schools of this State, by imparting instruction in the art of teaching, in 
all branches of study which pertain toa common-school education, in the elements of 
the natural science — including agricultural chemistry, animal and vegetable physi- 
ology, — in the fundamental laws of the United States and of the State of Illinois, in 
regard to the rights and duties of citizens, and in such other duties as the Board of 
Education may from time to time prescribe. 

Thorough discipline will be enforced in every department of 

the University. 

Experience has shown it to be very necessary that a perfect un- 
derstanding should exist between the Principal and those with 
whom the students board, in respect to the habits and conduct of 
students at their rooms. This will accordingly be more carefully 
attended to in future. 

Physical exercises will be had daily in all the departments. 



Board can be obtained in good families for $2.50 a week, ex- 
clusive of fuel, lights and washing ; when these are furnished, 
except washing, the usual charge is $3.00 a week. 



The expense of board is reduced about one-half, by boarding in 
clubs, and by self-boarding. 



The following may be considered a near approximation to the 
necessary Expenses for one year, exclusive of pocket-money, ap- 
parel, traveling, and board in vacations : 

Board, 40 weeks, from $50.00 to $120 00 

Books and Stationeiw, « 10.00 to 15.00 

Washing, " 12.00 to 18.00 



Total, $72.00 $153.00 

Tuition is free. 



--: 




STATE NORMAL UNIVERSITY. 23 




-ft 



Text-Books are furnished free for use in the school-rooms ; but 
students are expected to furnish their own books for use at home, 
so that the books belonging to the University may not be removed 
from the building. 

Students are advised to bring with them such books as they 
may have, but not to purchase others until they arrive at the Uni- 
versitv. 



The Apparatus is excellent in quality, and sufficiently ample 
for ordinary purposes of illustration. 



The Diploma of the University is conferred upon all those who 
creditably complete its full course of study and practice. 

There are two Literary Societies, the Philadelphian and the 
Wrightonian, each of which has a well-selected library. 

The Museum and Library of the Illinois Natural History So- 
ciety are located in the University building, to which the students 
of the University will have access, under suitable restrictions. 



SUGGESTED FORM OF CERTIFICATE. 

I hereby certify that I am well acquainted with and know him (or 

her) to be a person of good moral character. 

In case the School Commissioner is not able to make the above 
certificate himself, something like the following indorsement 
should be appended by the School Commissioner : 

I am acquainted with , who signs the above certificate, and believe him 

to be an entirely reliable man, and so far as I know and believe, the above named ap- 
plicant is a person of good moral character. 



®& 





STATE NORMAL UNIVERSITY. 




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STATE NORMAL UNIVERSITY. 25 




m 



MODEL SCHOOL 



COURSE OF STUDY, ETC. 

The Model Department was established in order that there 
might be a school, exhibiting the best methods of teaching, dis- 
cipline and classification, which the Normal students should visit, 
and in which they should take part as instructors. Every effort 
will be put forth to make this, as far as may be, a perfect school, 
conducted upon the best methods, and showing the most whole- 
some results. 

It is intended that the course of study in its several departments 
shall embrace all that belongs to a thorough education, from the 
elements up to a preparation either for College or for business. 
But as the course is fully matured, a complete synopsis and 
description cannot be given. For the lower classes, a system of 
Object Lessons has been prepared with the greatest care. The 
design of this is to awaken the perceptive faculties, and to form a 
habit of accurate observation. Children thus trained not only 
make more thorough scholars, but also more practical men and 
women. 

The accompanying plan of study will give a generel idea of the 
subjects to be pursued in the higher department, and of the time 
allotted to each. It will be observed that two distinct courses are 
arranged for the High School : one to prepare students for College, 
and the other for general business. The two, however, are made 
to blend whenever practicable. But this plan is to be regarded 
as a thing proposed rather than adopted. It will be followed as 
near as may be, during the coming year, and a full and settled 
course will in the mean time be adjusted. 

The only requisites for admission are a small tuition fee, and a 
good character. 

Boys and girls from abroad may be confidently entrusted to the 
care of the Principal, Mr. Childs ; and besides the monthly re- 
port of scholarship and deportment at school, which is to be sent 
to all parents, he will include, if desired, a careful statement of 
each pupil's general deportment, and of the manner of spending 
leisure hours. 

The physical exercises will include military drill. 



^ 





26 STATE NORMAL UNIVERSITY. 




CALENDAR FOR 1863--64. 



The School Year of Forty Weeks is divided into Three Terms. 

The First Term begins Monday, September 7th, and contin- 
ues Fifteen Weeks. Semi-annual Meeting of the Board of Edu- 
cation, Wednesday, December 16th. Examination at the close of 
Term. 

VACATION OF ONE WEEK. 

The Second Term begins Monday, December 28th, and con- 
tinues Thirteen Weeks. 

VACATION OF ONE WEEK. 

The Third Term begins Monday, April 4th, and continues 
Twelve Weeks. Examination during the last Week of Term. 
Annual Meeting of the Board of Education, Wednesday, June 
22d. Annual Meeting of the Illinois Natural History Society, 
Wednesday, June 22d. Address before the Literary Societies, 
Thursday Evening, June 23d. Commencement Exercises, Fri- 
day, June 24th. 

VACATION OF TEN WEEKS. 





-If 




ARMY LIST. 



The following named persons, formerly teachers or students in 
the Normal University, are now, or have been, in the Union 
Army : 

TEACHERS— NORMAL DEPARTMENT. 



Charles E. Hovey, 
(a)Dr. E. R. Roe, 
Leander XL Potter, 
Ira Moore, 
Julien E. Bryant, 
*Dr. Saml. Willard, 



- Brigadier Gen., U. S. Vol. 
Lieut. Col., 33 d 111. Inf. 

- Lieut. Col., 33d 111. Inf. 
Capt. Co. G, 33d 111. Inf. 

- Lieut. Col. 1st Miss., (C. V.\ 
Surgeon, 97 ih 111. Inf. 



STUDENTS— NORMAL, DEPARTMENT. 

Edward Allyn, 
Jas. H. Beach, 
*Wm. C. Baker, 



Eugene F. Baldwin, 
fm. A. Black, - 
James H. Baily, 
(b) Charles Bovec, 
James M. Burch, 
Lorenzo D. Bovee, 
George M. Berkley, 
Joseph M. Chase, 
Wilson M. Chalfant, 
(c)Charles M. Clark, 
(cZ)Wm P. Carter, 
*J. W. Cox, 
Lewis P. Cleaveland, 



Private, Co. A, 33c? III. Inf. 
Private, Co. II., 20th III. Inf. 
Ord. Serg't Co. A, 33d III. Inf. 
Ord. Serg't Co. B, 12th Lid. Inf. 
Private, Co. — , S7th El. Inf. 
Gunboat Service. 
Corp., Co. A, 33d 111. Inf. 
Capt., Co. — , Mth 111. Inf. 
Private, Co. E, 10(M, III. Inf. 
Corp., Co. C, 13th 111. Inf. 
Corp., Co. — , 3d III. Cavalry. 
Private, Co. — , 104*7* III. Inf. 
Quarter Master, 2d La., [C. V.) 
Corp., Co. C, mh 111. Inf. . 
Private, Co. C, 33d 111. Inf. 
Ord. Serg't, 1st Ala., (C. V.) 




« 



28 



STATE NORMAL UNIVERSITY. 




fPeter T. Crist, - 
Elmer F. Clapp, 
Jesse Cunningham, 
(e)Ephraim D. Carrothers, 
John T. Curtis, 
J. Harvejr Button, 
(/)Wm. H. H. DeBoice, - 
(g)Wm. Downer, - 
* Valentine Denning, 
James K. Fyffe, - 
Wm. M. Fyffe, 
Wm. H. H. Fuller, 



C. Judson Gill, 
James Gilbraeth, 
E. Aaron Gove, 
(A)FrancisM. Gastman, 
Wm. A. Gunn, 
fCharles Hayes, - 
Peter Harper, 
John H. Hume, 
John M. House, 
Otho H. Hibbs, - 
*Ebenezer D. Harris, 
Charles E. Huston, 
Wm. W. Hall, 
Chas. D. Irons, 
Duncan G. Ingraham, 
Hiram W. Johnson, 
(i) Fred B. Jones, 
(j) Christopher Krebs 
John D. Kirkpatrick, 
A. B Keagle, 
Matthew R. Kell, 
Wm. Law, 
Dr. Jehu Little, 



Private, Co. F, Q8th III Inf. 

Private, Co. C, 76th 111. Inf. 

Private, Co. E, 78th 111. Inf. 

Serg't, Co. — , 20th 111. Inf. 

Hospital Steward, 97th 1U. Inf. 

1st Lieut., Co. A, 33d 111. Inf. 

Private, Co. A, 33d III. Inf. 

Serg't, Co. E, 70th 111. Inf. 

Private, Co. G, 4th 111. Cavalry. 

2d Lieut, Co. A, 33d III. Inf. 

Private, Vaughn's Springfield Bat. 

1st Lieut., Co. G, 84th 111. Inf. 
Detailed as Signal Officer on 
Gen. McCook's Staff. 

Capt., Co. B, 33d 111. Inf. 

Private, Co. — . 3d 111. Cav. 

Adjutant, 33d III. Inf. 

Corp., Co. A, 33d 111. Inf. 

Serg't, Co. K, 8th, 111 Inf. 

Private, Co. K, 8th 111. Inf. 

Serg't, Co. G, Wh Wis. Inf. 

Corp., Co. — , llth 111. Gav. 

110th 111. Inf. 

Private, Co. E, 04th 111. Inf. 

Corp., Co.,A,ZMlll. Inf. 

Private, Co. A, 33d 111. Inf. 

Serg't, Co.—, 115th III. Inf. 

Private, Co. —, 77th 111. Inf. 

Corp., Co. 5,33d III. Inf. 

Serg't, Co. E, 8th III. Inf. 

Private, Co. — , 77th III, Inf. 

Private, Co. B, 8th 111. Inf. 

Private, Co. B, 93d III. Inf. 

1st Lieut., Co, D, 117th 111. Inf. 

Private, Co. D, 40th III Inf. 

Com. Serg't, 47th III. Inf. 

1st As't Surgeon, 24th Mo. Inf. 





STATE NORMAL UNIVERSITY. 



29 




(fc)Alvin T. Lewis, 
Clark Leal, 
*Moses I. Morgan. 
(Z)Isaac N. McCuddy, 
Joseph R. McGregor, - 
fGeorge Marsh, 
Wm. W. Murphy, 
G. Hyde Norton, 
-Marvin J. Nye, 
Edwin Philbrook, 
Truman J. Pearce, 
* James G. Pearce, 
Henry C. Prevost, 
Edward M. Pike, 
Henry H. Pope, - 
George Peter, 
Richard R. Puffer, 
Orange Parret, 
Logan H. Roots, - 
Rasselas P. Reynolds, 
George McClellan Rex, 
Thomas M. Roberts, - 
* :: "John II. Rhomack, 
J. M. Stine, 

fJustin S. Spaulding, - 
Gilbert L. Seybold, 
Byron Sheldon, 
Samuel Smith, 
(»») Johnson W. Straight, 
Edwin Scranton, 
Frederick J. Seybold, 
fWm. A. H.Tilton, 
John J. Taylor, 
John H. Walker, 
John X. Wilson, 
Chas. E. Wilcox, 



Corp., Co. A, 33d 111. Inf. 
Private, Co. A, 118*7* 111. Inf. 
Capt., Co. B, 33d 111, Inf. 
Corp., Co. A, 33d 111. Inf. 

, Irish Brigade. 

Private, Co. K, 69*/z 111. Inf. 
Serg't, Co. — , 87^ 111. lnf 
Capt., Co. A, 33d III. Inf. 
Private, Co. A, 33d III. Inf. 
Q. Master's Serg't, 8th 111. Inf. 
Private, Co. A, 33d III. Inf. 
Private, Ottawa Battery. 
Serg't Maj. 94th 111. Inf. 
Ord. Serg't, Co. A, 33d 111. Inf. 
Capt., Co. B, 33d III. Inf. 
Ord. Serg't, Co, A, 43d III. Inf. 
Private, Co. E, 8th 111. Inf. 
Private, Co. B, 71th III Inf. 
Quarter Master, 8lst 111. Inf. 
Corp., Co. A, 33d 111 Inf. 
Private, Co. I, 33d 111. Inf. 

Co. B, 41th 111. Inf. 

Private, Co. G, QSlh Ohio Inf. 
Private, Co. M, 16th 111. Cav, 
Private, Co. K, 8th 111. Inf. 
Private, Co. A, 33d 111. Inf. 

Ill Inf. 

Private, Co. A, 33d 111. Inf. 
Private, Co. A, 33d 111. Inf. 
Miss. Marine Brigade. 

Ul. Inf. 

Ord, Serg't, 68$ 111. Inf. 

Co. K, 20th 111. Inf. 

Private, Co. E, 58th III Inf. 
1st Lieut., Co.F, 33d 111. Inf. 
Serg't Major, 33d 111. Inf. 



*Si 




80 



STATE NORMAL UNIVERSITY. 




Jas. E. Willis, 
Peleg R. Walker, 
Chas. W. Wills, 
Theophilus F. Willis, 
William Walton, 
Cyrus I. Wilson, 
J. R. Walker, 



Private, Co. F, 87th 111. Inf. 
2d Lieut., Co. K, 92d 111. Inf. 
Capt., Co. — 103c? 111. Inf. 
Private, Co. C, 11th III. Inf. 

111. Inf. 

III. Inf. 

Capt., Co. —, 2,m 111. Inf. 



TEACHERS— MODEL. SCHOOL. 



(n) Joseph G. Howell, 
*J. Howard Burnham, 

STUDENTS- 

Franklin B. Augustus, 
Joshua Baily, 
f John G. Dietrich, 
f Joseph T. Davison, 
Arthur H. Dillon, - 
Ulysses D. Eddy, 
Richard Huxtable, 
Win. Hogue, 
Jas. F. Hough, 
fRobert.McCart, 

Mills, 

(fl)Wm, A. Pearce, 
fEdward L. Price, 
Myron J. Peterson, 
fFrancis S. Rearden, 



1st Lieut, Co. K, 8th 111. Inf. 

- Capt., Co. A, 33d ill Inf. 

3IODEL SCHOOL. 

Private, Co. A, 33d 111. Inf. 

- Ord. Serg't, Co. B, 13d 111 Inf. 
Pricatc, Co. — , mh III. Inf. 

- Serg't, Co. F. 68th 111. Inf. 
Private, Co. A, 33d 111. Inf. 

- 1st Lieut., 4th N. Y. Artillery. 
Private, Co. H, 77th III. Inf. 

- Private, Co. G, 69$ 111. Inf 
33d III. Inf. 

- Serft, Co. G, QSth III. Inf.. 

Ill, Inf. 

Private, Co. A, 33d 111. Inf. 
Corp., Co. F, mh 111. Inf. 
Private, Co. E, 75th 111. Inf. 
Corp., Co. G, mh 111 Inf 



RECAPITULATION. 

Commissioned Officers. 27 

Non-Commissioned Officers, 33 

Privates, 45 

Rank unknown, 12 

Total. 117 




STATE NORMAL UNIVERSITY. 31 




REFERENCES 



*Resigned or honorably discharged, on account of continued ill health, 

fThree month's service. 

(a)Disabled by wounds at the siege of Vicksburg, and resigned. 

(fr)Disabled by five wounds, and honorably discharged. 

(c)Mortally wounded at Milliken's Bend, La., June 7th, 1863. 

(^Disabled by wounds at Shiloh, and honorably discharged. 

(e)Killed at the siege of Fort Donelson. 

(/)Died in hospital atlronton, Mo., February, 1862. 

(#)Died July 23d, 1862. 

(7i)Died in camp, on Black River, Mo., March 22d, 1862. 

(i)Reported killed at the siege of Vicksburg, May 22d, 1863. 

(^Disabled by wounds at Donelson and Shiloh, and honorably discharged. 

(/.-)Killed at Wilkinson's Landing, Miss., August 4th, 1862. 

(Z)Died in hospital at Ironton, Mo., October, 1861. 

(m)Lost an arm in battle, and returned to the Normal, 

(w)Killed at the siege of Fort Donelson. 

(o)Killed at the battle of Jackson, Miss., July 12th, 1863. 

The above list is as complete as it can be made with the infor- 
mation at hand. Corrections or additions will be thankfully 
received. 

A record is also being kept of the personal history of Normal 
Students in the war, for which purpose it is desired that the sol- 
diers or their friends should furnish the necessary information. 



®& 




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